2020-21 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    Jun 27, 2022  
2020-21 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

Courses


Check major and minor requirement sections in the Departments, Programs and Areas of Study section to determine if specific courses will satisfy requirements. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the course will necessarily satisfy a requirement.

Click here  to view a Key to Course Listings and Discipline codes.

 

Economics

  
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    ECON051 PO - Principles: Macroeconomics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Goel; M. Kuehlwein; N. Novarro; N. Kodaverdian; Staff
    Credit: 1

    A first course on modern market economies. Emphasizes the determination of national income, fluctuations and growth; the monetary system; the problems of inflation and unemployment; and international trade.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON052 PO - Principles: Microeconomics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano; S. Marks; N. Novarro; N. Kodaverdian; Staff
    Credit: 1

    Second principles course on basic tools of market and price theory and their applications to the operations of firms; the consumption and work choices of individuals; the effects of government taxes and policies; and market efficiency and market failure. Prerequisite: ECON 051 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON057 PO - Economic Statistics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): P. De Pace; G. Smith; M. Zemel; B. Cutter
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the statistical tools used by economists. Topics include probability theory, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing and linear regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 030 PO  or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
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    ECON101 PO - Macroeconomic Theory

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Kuehlwein; M. Steinberger
    Credit: 1

    Study of the economy in the aggregate. Course covers the measurement and determinates of national income and employment, money supply, price level, trade flows and exchange rates. Also examines operation of government fiscal and monetary policies and implications for output growth, interest rates, exchange rates and inflation rates in the short and long run. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO ; ECON 052 PO ; and one of MATH 030 PO , MATH 031 PO , MATH 032 PO , MATH 060 PO  or MATH 067 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON102 PO - Microeconomic Theory

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown; E. Huet-Vaughn, S. Marks; K. Wilson
    Credit: 1

    Theories of consumer behavior, demand, production, costs, the firm, market organization, resource use and income distribution in a modern market economy. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO ; ECON 052 PO  and one of MATH 030 PO , MATH 031 PO , MATH 032 PO , MATH 060 PO  or MATH 067 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON107 PO - Applied Econometrics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): T. Andrabi; B. Cutter; K. Wilson, P. De Pace
    Credit: 1

    This course teaches quantitative methods for testing economic models, with a focus on linear regression analysis and casual inference. The key focus is the design and implementation of an empirical research paper. The course develops the student’s understanding and analysis of data through frequent empirical assignments. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  or ECON 101 PO ; ECON 052 PO  or ECON 102 PO ; ECON 057 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive
  
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    ECON115 PO - Economics of Immigration

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano
    Credit: 1

    The goal of this course is to examine the current literature on immigration economics. We will explore the basic immigration theories used by economists and apply them to different real world scenarios. In this course students will critically understand the assumptions that form different economic theories, and in turn, foster the critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses that characterize the different policy proposals. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference
  
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    ECON116 PO - Race in the U.S. Economy

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano
    Credit: 1

    The impact of race on economic status from the Jim Crow era to the present; historic patterns of occupational and residential segregation; trends in racial inequality of income and wealth; economic theories of discrimination; and strategies for economic advancement. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  or ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference
  
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    ECON117 PO - Managerial Accounting Financial Analysis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Examines the role of accounting information in decision making. Course focuses on developing student ability to critically analyze financial statements and related documents. It also addresses the policies and procedures that compose the accounting information system.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON118 CM - The Process of Environmental Policymaking


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON119 PO - Health Economics: Applications to Health Policy in the COVID-19 ERA

    When Offered: One-time only; fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano
    The US Health Care System is fraught with many problems. Economics is widely applied in government and the private sector, in the form of Health Economics, to understand and address these widely known problems including how to address COVID-19. Have you ever wondered why health care costs so much in the USA or why pharmaceuticals cost so much? Have you ever wondered how health insurance works and why Health Insurance is a good thing but why so many people are uninsured or what happens when someone cannot afford health insurance? Have you ever wondered why there are so many disparities in health by race and income or why health is better when the economy is flourishing than in a recession? Did you know that African Americans, Native Americans, and Latinos are more likely to die from COVID-19 than individuals who are white? Have you wondered why that may be and what can be done about it? Have you ever wondered whether economics might provide insights into how to address the number of people with behavioral health or mental health issues? Have you wondered what is being done to address those individuals whose mental health has deteriorated due to COVID-19? Have you ever wondered whether economics could be used to reduce the number of people who smoke and vape and thus threaten the health of themselves and others? Have you ever wondered why there was a shortage or providers to treat various conditions or why doctors and hospitals have been devastated financially due to COVID-19 and may close? This course will explain how fundamental economic concepts such as supply, demand, monopoly and market power, risk and insurance, substitutes and complements, externalities, taxation and cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis, can be used to better understand and solve some of these huge and devastating health issues in our society. It also will explain how basic economic concepts influence human behavior and impact personal health through decisions regarding how much care to get from doctors, emergency rooms and hospitals, including during the COVID-19 pandemic.  It will also explain the types of decisions that are made using cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON120 PO - Economics of Crime

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): S. Marks
    Credit: 1

    This course explores the economic causes and consequences of crime, with a primary focus on the United States. Topics include the relationships among criminal activity, arrest rates, conviction rates and incarceration and how these differ by race, gender, age and income. Benefit-cost analysis is employed to evaluate the allocation of resources within the criminal justice system, including drug enforcement laws, anti-crime strategies, mass incarceration, capital punishment and inmate rehabilitation programs. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive
  
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    ECON121 PO - Economics of Gender and Family

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown
    Credit: 1

    Analysis of the factors contributing to the economic circumstances of women and men in modern market economies, especially the United States. Trends in labor force participation, occupational choice and the economic determinants of earnings, household income and poverty. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO  or ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference
  
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    ECON122 PO - Poverty and Income Distribution

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Steinberger
    Credit: 1

    Analysis of factors contributing to poverty and income inequality, primarily within the United States. Impact of government transfers and taxes, labor market discrimination and economic growth. Focus on empirical tools for evaluation of policies to alleviate poverty, including welfare, workfare, education and job training. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO ; ECON 052 PO  or ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference; Writing Intensive
  
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    ECON123 PO - International Economics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): T. Andrabi; M. Goel; S. Marks
    Credit: 1

    The principles and theories of international trade and finance. Topics include trade policy, macroeconomic stabilization, regional integration and the international monetary system. IR 118 PO  and ECON123  PO may not both be taken for credit. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  and ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON124 PO - Economics of Latin America

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano
    Credit: 1

    This course will explore the economic development of Latin America since independence. While covering over two centuries of economic history, this course will center around answering the question why a region with so many opportunities, has failed to fulfill the promise of economic development? In particular, this course will focus on the role that institutions (or lack of) have on the economic development in the region, and how other economic factors have affected the long run performance of the region. Among the topics covered by this course are: the legacy of colonialism, inequality and internal strife; industrialization, unionization, corporatism, and political protectionism; the post-war years, import substitution and foreign debt, and the limits and challenges of neoliberalism. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO  and ECON 057 PO  , or MATH 058 PO  or POLI 090 PO  .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive; Speaking Intensive
  
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    ECON125 PO - Natural Resource Economics and Policy

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. Jurewitz
    Credit: 1

    Positive and normative economic analysis of natural resources and the institutions governing their uses. Covers economic theory of non-renewable and renewable resources; tragedy of the commons; mineral depletion; recycling; water allocation; fisheries; agriculture; forestry; land use policies; valuation of ecosystem services; international resource treaties; biodiversity and species extinction; wilderness and habitat preservation; population economics; and economic growth and sustainability. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON126 PO - Economic Development

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): T. Andrabi
    Credit: 1

    Study of economic development in low-income countries. Development thinking on role of market vs. the state; interaction of civil, political and economic spheres; quantification of social and economic aspects of development; incidence of poverty; industrialization; agricultural transformation; land, labor and credit allocation in rural environments; the household as an allocation mechanism; and environmental challenges of development. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  and ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON127 PO - Environmental Economics

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): B. Cutter
    Credit: 1

    Positive and normative issues involving the optimal regulation of pollution. Analysis of environmental laws and policies and the institutions that implement these policies. Examination of incentive-based pollution control policies such as cap and trade and pollution taxes. Consideration of economic and ecological approaches towards sustainability. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO  or ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON128 PO - Energy Economics and Policy

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. Jurewitz
    Credit: 1

    The economics of the major sectors of the energy industry: oil, coal, natural gas, electricity, nuclear power, etc. Emphasis on industry structure, production technologies, regulation and public policy issues. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON129 PO - Health Economics

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): N. Novarro
    Credit: 1

    Health economics is the study of health related activities such as the production and consumption of physician services, pharmaceuticals, health insurance, dental care, alcohol, and junk food. The health care industry is important in both developed and developing economies, and accounts for approximately 20% of U.S. GDP. In this course, we investigate health related behavior using techniques from sub-fields of economics including industrial organization, labor economics, information economics, public economics, and behavioral economics. We examine the health care industry in the U.S. and the argument for reform, and consider alternative models such as those used in other developed countries. By the end of the course, students will be equipped with the basic tools to better understand health and health care fields from an economic perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON130 PO - Behavioral Economics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Dold
    Credit: 1

    The field of behavioral economics draws on insights from psychology, neuroscience and experimental economics to deepen our understanding of individual and aggregate economic behavior. The course explores experimental evidence of systematic departures in human behavior from the predictions of the standard economic framework and presents models that have been developed to explain these behaviors. Topics include risk and uncertainty, reference dependence, temptation and self-control, fairness, reciprocity and cooperation. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO ; ECON 057 PO  or PSYC 051 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON131 PO - Economics of Entrepreneurship (CP)

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): M. Goel
    Credit: 1

    Entrepreneurs are critical to the growth of an economy. This course explores the determinants and consequences of entrepreneurship, including differences in challenges faced by gender and race, impact on economic growth, sources of finance and implications for job creation. We also contrast the implications of and challenges to entrepreneurship across countries. This is a community partnership course and will involve interviewing new and small businesses in the local area. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO  and ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference
  
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    ECON132 PO - Empirical Methods of Industrial Organization

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): K. Wilson
    Credit: 1

    An introduction to the computational and empirical methods used by Industrial Organization economists, including those in academia, consulting, and government antitrust agencies. This course focuses on techniques for computing and estimating models of consumer and firm behavior in oligopolistic markets. Topics include estimation of production functions, demand for differentiated products, static games, and dynamic optimization. Applications of these topics to merger analysis, public policy, and various industries are explored. Emphasis will be placed on the programming and implementation of these models, though no prior background in computer science is required. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO  and ECON 057 PO , or experience with calculus.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON134 PO - Economic Analysis of Politics

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): M. Dold
    Credit: 1

    How can politics solve collective action problems? Why do some policies fail? The economic analysis of politics, also known as public choice or political economy, presents a coherent analytical framework to tackle these puzzling questions. It starts with the observation that individual motivation in politics is not fundamentally different from the motivation of market participants. Therefore, economists can apply their analytical tools to analyze the behavior of political actors. With the rise of behavioral economics, economists have started to apply models of bounded rationality to the study of political processes. This course will cover the standard rational choice approach and end with a discussion of current research topics in behavioral political economy. The course comprises four parts: (I) normative foundations (ethical theories, collective goals, Pareto concepts); (II) social dilemmas (externalities, coordination failure, commitment problem); (III) possibilities and constraints of public policy (strategic adjustment, dynamic inconsistency, special interests); (IV) current issues in behavioral political economy (populism, the role of the media, irrational voting). The course will not discuss politics institution by institution. Instead, the objective of this course is to develop some habits of mind that enable the students see the world of politics through the analytical lens of economics. Prerequisites: ECON 051 PO   or ECON 052 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON135 PO - Analysis of Public Projects: Benefits and Costs

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2017.
    Instructor(s): B. Cutter
    Credit: 1

    Benefit-cost analysis is an important analytical tool that is used worldwide to decide which public projects to pursue and what regulations are viable. Benefit-cost analysis is required for major regulations in the United States and is increasingly used to support policy decisions around the world. Understanding its advantages and limitations, and being able to distinguish well-conducted from poor analysis, is an important skill. This class will cover the key components of benefit cost analysis including estimating impacts using market prices, as well as outcomes that are not easily measured in monetary terms (such as environmental quality, health, and longevity.) This class will also examine the history of benefit cost analysis. It will focus on water projects especially, as well as other public infrastructure projects. The key student goal is to be able to conduct a basic benefit cost analysis, and to be able to critique benefit cost analyses. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ECON052 PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON140 CM - The World Economy


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON141 PZ - The Chinese Economy


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON142 CM - Pol/Econ of Nat Resource Policy


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON142 PZ - Japanese Economy


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON150 PO - Industrial Organization

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): K. Wilson
    Credit: 1

    Techniques for analyzing industries and competitors. Organizing and operating the modern corporation. Pricing strategies: price discrimination, tie-in sales and non-linear pricing. Strategic behavior: predation and collusion; vertical integration and vertical restrictions; mergers and acquisitions. Information, advertising and disclosure. Decision making over time: product durability, patents and technological change. Antitrust and regulation. Prerequisite: ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON151 PO - Labor Economics

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Steinberger
    Credit: 1

    Human resources and business strategies toward employees. Occupational choice, investing in human capital. Household decision making: balancing family, work, home production and leisure. Migration and immigration. Pay and productivity: setting wages within the firm. Gender, race and ethnicity in the labor market. Public policy toward the workplace. The role of trade unions. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO , ECON 101 PO  and ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Analyzing Difference
  
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    ECON153 PO - Urban Economics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano
    In this course we will examine how people’s economic activity is distributed across space. We will explore why do cities exist and what determines their size and location. In addition, we will explore what determines the location decisions of firms and households. We will conclude by examining how markets empower or limit these location decisions and the role that policy plays in addressing any market failures. Throughout the course we will present the economic models that describe agents’ decision making, yet this course will emphasize the ability to gather and synthesize data to analyze these models. Prerequisites: ECON102 PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON154 PO - Game Theory for Economists

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): T. Andrabi; N. Novarro
    Credit: 1

    Introduces the main tools of noncooperative game theory as used in current economics literature. Topics include formalities of modeling competitive situations, various solution concepts such as Nash equilibrium and its refinements, signaling games, repeated games under different informational environments, bargaining models and issues of cooperation and reputation. Applications from economics, politics, law, corporate and business strategy. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO  and ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON155 PO - Law and Economics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): S. Marks
    Credit: 1

    A case-based approach to the economic analysis of legal institutions and the common law: property, contacts and torts. Prerequisite: ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    ECON156 PO - Security Valuation and Portfolio Theory

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): G. Smith
    Credit: 1

    Selection and valuation of financial assets, particularly corporate stocks. Financial markets and the economy, efficient-markets hypotheses, security-valuation models, decision making under uncertainty, portfolio selection and capital-asset pricing. Open to senior economics majors only. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisites: ECON 101 PO  and ECON 102 PO . Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON157 PO - Corporate Finance

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): M. Zemel
    Credit: 1

    Examines the financing decisions of firms and explores links between finance and business. Topics include corporate governance, agency issues, net present value analysis, risk, cost of capital, dividend policy, capital structure, market efficiency, takeovers and mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO  and ECON 102 PO ; ECON 117 PO  recommended.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON159 PO - Economics of the Public Sector

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown, E. Huet-Vaughn
    Credit: 1

    The microeconomic rationale for government activity in a market economy and the economic effects of such activity. Market failure and the tools of normative analysis; income redistribution, design of major federal expenditure programs such as Social Security, medical insurance and welfare; the design, incidence and behavioral consequences of tax policy and collective decision making and the theory of public choice. Prerequisite: ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON161 PO - Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): P. De Pace
    Credit: 1

    Selected issues in macroeconomic theory, empirical analysis and policy, including growth, unemployment, consumption, investment, inflation, budget deficits and monetary policy rules. Covers rational expectations, real business cycles, sticky price models, endogenous growth, financial crises and macroeconometrics. Prerequisites: ECON 101 PO , ECON 102 PO  and either ECON 107 PO  or ECON 167 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON162 PO - Advanced Microeconomic Analysis

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): F. Lozano; S. Marks
    Credit: 1

    Selected topics in modern microeconomic theory, including constrained optimization, decision making under uncertainty, market failures under imperfect information and their remedies and strategic behavior. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO  and ECON 102 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON163 PO - Advanced Topics in International Macroeconomics

    When Offered: Last offfered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Goel
    Credit: 1

    This course surveys recent international macroeconomic research topics including misallocation of resources and their impact on growth, labor market frictions, product churning and innovation in developing countries, firm dynamics and growth, and corruption and growth. In addition to lecture, students will read and present recent research articles and participate in class discussions. Prerequisites: ECON 101 PO , ECON 102 PO , and ECON 107 PO , or ECON 167 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON164 PO - Technology and Growth

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Kuehlwein
    A close examination of growth theory, focusing on technological innovation in developed countries. Endogenous growth models, the role of international factors, culture, institutions, industrial structure, education, population growth and policy in promoting innovation and growth. Theory, history and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: ECON101 PO and ECON102 PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON165 PO - Advanced Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): E. Huet-Vaughn
    Credit: 1

    This course surveys recent research in behavioral and experimental economics and introduces students to the use of experiments in economics. The course will cover modern economic theories developed to explain human behavior, as well as experimental methods for testing economic theories. Students will critically evaluate the design and analysis of experiments in published papers and evaluate the implications of results for public policy. Student projects will include an empirical application of the behavioral phenomena learned in class. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ECON 101 PO  and ECON 102 PO ; ECON 107 PO  or ECON 167 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON166 PO - Advanced Topics in Banking

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Zemel
    Credit: 1

    The course will introduce students to the unique nature of financial intermediaries, with a focus on commercial banks. We will examine the role that these institutions play in the economy, the risks they face and the general approaches taken by both banks and regulators to manage these risks. The course will include a module on modern, quantitative methods to measure financial risks. In addition, the course will highlight current policy questions regarding the role of financial institutions in our economy. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO , ECON 156 PO  or ECON 157 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
  •  

    ECON167 PO - Econometrics

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): P. De Pace
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the theory and practice of econometrics. Application of statistical inference, probability theory, matrix algebra and calculus to multiple-regression analysis. Lecture, computer workshop, problem sets, term project, student presentations and critiques. Prerequisites: ECON 057 PO , ECON 101 PO , ECON 102 PO  and MATH 060 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive
  
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    ECON171 CM - Environmental Economics


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON172 PZ - Environmental Economics


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    ECON190 PO - Senior Seminar in Economics

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown, M. Dold, M. Kuehlwein; G.Smith;
    Credit: 1

    Analysis of selected problems in economics. Required for graduation. Full course credit. Prerequisites: ECON 101 PO , ECON 102 PO  and either ECON 107 PO  or ECON 167 PO  must be completed in advance of participating in the Senior Seminar.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Speaking Intensive
  
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    ECON195 PO - Senior Activity in Economics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0

    Comprised of two parts: (1) the Major Field Achievement Test in Economics; and (2) regular participation in the departmental colloquium. Required for graduation. No credit. (December graduates enroll fall semester.)
  
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    ECON199DRPO - Economics: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    ECON199IRPO - Economics: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    ECON199RAPO - Economics: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Research Assistantship. Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

Education

  
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    EDUC424 CG - Gender and Education


    Credit: 1.0

    See the Claremont Graduate University Catalog for a description of this course.

Engineering

  
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    ENGR004 HM - Introduction to Engineering Design and Manufacturing


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

English

  
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    ENGL001 PZ - Literary Theory


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL009 AF - Community Poetry: Black Feminist rEVOLution


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL009 PZ - Black Feminist Community Learning


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL010 PO - Introduction to Close Reading

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020
    Instructor(s): C. Rosenfeld
    This course will focus on the central method of literary criticism known as “close reading.” Close reading begins, not with the question, “What do these words mean?” but instead, the question, “What do these words say?” And then, “What if these words mean just what they say?” And then, “What would have to be true about the world in which this poem or story operates in order for these words to mean just what they say?” Through our iterative encounter with these and related questions, we will consider how literature compels us to revise what we know, or think we know, about the world and how it operates. It is the central argument of this class that close reading allows us to understand poetic and fictional worlds according to their discrete and unique logic; it is the political gamble of this course that close reading the worlds of fiction and poetry permits us to see ‘this’ world; ‘the actual, real, or historical world’ in its capacity to be otherwise. Readings will range from Isabella Whitney, George Herbert, and John Donne to Shirley Jackson, Aimee Bender, and Carmen Maria Machado. We will watch a few films (Hitchcock’s Rope and Lamorisse’s The Red Balloon) and we will read example of close reading from the visual arts (e.g. T.J. Clark).
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL012 AF - Introduction to African-American Literature


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL012A AF - Introduction to African American Literature Before 1865.


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
  
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    ENGL012B AF - Introduction to African-American Literature after 1865


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL025 PO - Introduction to Literary Nonfiction

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): E. Kindley
    What makes a work of nonfiction ‘literary?’ Where are the boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, lyric and essay, memoir and history, art and information? This course will introduce students to a range of innovative twentieth- and twenty-first century nonfiction writers who have redefined the form. Authors to be studied may include Joseph Mitchell, James Baldwin, Janet Malcolm, Vladimir Nabokov, Maggie Nelson, Esmé Weijun Wang, and Durga Chew-Bose. Students will have opportunities to write in both analytical and creative modes, producing their own nonfiction texts on topics of their choosing. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL050 PO - Modern British and Irish Fiction

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): K. Dettmar
    Credit: 1

    This course surveys some of the most significant trends, via some of the most important novels, in the 20th-century British tradition. Works studied include novels by Beckett, Conrad, Ford, Forster, Green, Ishiguro, Joyce, Kelman, Orwell, Rhys, Rushdie, Smith and Woolf. (H5, DG)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL055A PO - Topics in Contemporary Literature: Impossible Novels

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): J. Lethem
    Credit: 1.0

    The novel is an impossible pursuit, but some are more impossible than others. If, as in the poet Randall Jarrell’s definition, “a novel is a prose narrative of a certain length with something wrong with it,” then the novels studied in this course might be called, for their formal strategies or imaginative or verbal excesses, “prose narratives with more than a few things wrong with them.” Making uncommon demands, they raise the risk/reward quotient for their readers (and, obviously, their authors as well), and exchange the usual consolations of fiction for the possibility of plunging the reader into an unforgettable experience, even as they beg to go unread or at least unfinished. Letter grade only. May be repeated once for credit. (H5)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL056 PO - Contemporary Native American Literature

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): V. Thomas
    Credit: 1

    In the Native American context, English is the language of holocaust; to write in English necessitates “Reinventing the Enemy’s Language” for purposes of indigenous survival and self-representation. This course engages fiction, essays, poetry, film and critical theory while considering the implications of genocide, political invisibility and experiencing diaspora in one’s homeland. (TH, H5, RC, DG)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL058 PO - Native American Women Writers

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2016.
    Instructor(s): V.Thomas
    Credit: 1

    This course focuses on issues of memory and identity in writing by indigenous women writers in the Americas. Readings will focus on memoir, poetry, fiction, essays and criticism, including works by Leslie Silko, Paula Gunn Allen, Joy Harjo, Louise Erdrich, Wendy Rose, Gloria Bird and others. Letter grade only. (TH, H5, RC, GS)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL059 JT - Ovidian Figures

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): C. Rosenfeld
    Credit: 1

    Ovid’s Metamorphoses begins with the poet’s “intention” “to tell of bodies changed/ to different forms.”  This course takes up that poem’s iterative, almost compulsive, attempt to capture the very moment at which one “body” ceases to be itself by transforming into something else. Tracing Ovid’s narrative scenes, including the myths of Apollo and Daphne, Echo and Narcissus, Actaeon, Philomela, and Pygmalion (to name a few)  across centuries of retelling, refashioning, and reimagining, we will ask: How does one body, one constellation of matter, assume another shape? What is the relation of the human body to the plants and animals and minerals that it can become? How might the design concept of “affordance” encourage us to rethink the capacities of form? Most importantly, we will attempt to answer these questions through two distinct, historically competitive, but mutually generative modalities of inquiry: the verbal and the visual. Co-taught by a literary critic who specializes in poetry and poetic theory and a painter who specializes in figure drawing, course readings and assignments will move across these fields, requiring students to both analyze and create, write and draw, describe and make. Possible topics include: the temporalities of verbal and visual arts; ekphrasis (or the verbal depiction of the visual arts); enargeia (or the “vivid” style of language); the blazon (or the piecemeal depiction of the human body); human and post-human; psychoanalytic and feminist theory; history and philosophy of science; theories of form; bodily violence and the aesthetic; the fragmented body; abstraction as a strategy for defying categorization; perversion and developing a moral discourse on perception.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL064A PO - Creative Writing: Fiction

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): J. Lethem
    Credit: 1

    Practice in a literary form, with some attention to technical theory and to the creative process. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must submit a writing sample to receive permission. (E)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6
  
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    ENGL064B PO - Creative Writing: Poetry

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): P. Sharma
    Credit: 1

    Practice in a literary form, with some attention to technical theory and to the creative process. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must submit a writing sample to receive permission. (E)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6
  
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    ENGL064C PO - Creative Writing: Nonfiction

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): E. Kindley
    Credit: 1

    This course focuses on the craft of creative nonfiction writing. Students will experiment with a variety of nonfiction genres including reportage, cultural criticism, lyric essay, and memoir. Readings may include Joan Didion, James Baldwin, Geoff Dyer, Roland Barthes, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Maggie Nelson, and Elif Batuman.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6; Writing Intensive
  
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    ENGL064D PO - Elements of Creative Writing: Screenwriting

    When Offered: Spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Practice in a literary form, with some attention to technical theory and to the creative process. Prerequisites: permission of instructor; must submit writing sample to receive permission. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6
  
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    ENGL067 PO - Literary Interpretation

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Training in certain historical, theoretical and methodological dimensions of literary study in relation to a topic chosen by the professor. Special attention to close textual analysis and to writing effectively about literature. (67)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    ENGL068 PO - Literatures of the American West: From Twain to Didion

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2016.
    Instructor(s): D. Berton Emerson
    Credit: 1

    This course surveys the literature of the American West in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the lens of two conflicting discourses: “the myth of the frontier” and “a legacy of conquest.” Touching down at key moments in the development of the imagined and actual West, we investigate a variety of supplementary discourses fueling nineteenth-century westward expansion and settlement (e.g. empire for liberty, manifest destiny, gold rush) and their perpetuation and evolution in the twentieth century (e.g. closing of the frontier, Hollywood, Route 66). Texts range from the travel narratives of Lewis and Clark and Mark Twain to the social protests of John Rollin Ridge and Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton to the modernist experiments of Nathanael West, Joan Didion, and Don DeLillo. Through this broad survey of western American literature, students encounter a variety of voices competing over the symbolic and the manifest representation of a highly coveted territorial space. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL073 PO - The Literature of Gambling

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Raff
    Credit: 1

    Narratives of gambling-in which the arc of a life may seem to depend on a roll of the dice-in comparative perspective, with an emphasis on various concepts for thinking about an unknown future, including fate, divine intervention, luck, hazard, chance, speculation, risk, and accident. Some attention to recent scholarship linking the rise of the English novel-and of “probable” or likely stories-to the development of the mathematics of probability. Primary readings may include Plutarch, Herodotus, Rabelais, Cervantes, Pascal, Defoe, Pope, Boswell, Byron, Pushkin, Balzac, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, George Eliot, Chekhov, David Mamet, Hunter S. Thompson, and Jonathan Lethem. We will discuss a few films as well. No prior experience in gambling or literary studies required.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL074 PO - British Novel, Defoe to Austen

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Raff
    Credit: 1

    The British novel from its beginnings in the prose narratives of the late 17th century to its form in the early 19th century. Readings from Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Goldsmith, Sterne, Burney, Cleland, Radcliffe, Austen and others. (H3, GS)
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL075 PO - British Novel II

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): S. Raff
    Credit: 1

    Survey of the Victorian novel, with particular attention to class, gender and genre. Primary texts by such authors as Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontes, Eliot, Collins, Braddon, Hardy, James, Stoker, Stevenson, Gissing and Conrad. (H4, RC)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL077 PO - How Shakespeare Works

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): A.Kunin; C.Rosenfeld
    Credit: 1

    We know that Shakespeare’s plays work. They function successfully as poetic and dramatic engines. We know something about how Shakespeare got there. This course, which is intended as an introduction to literary studies, is a project in reverse engineering. Given that Shakespeare’s path to becoming Shakespeare is closed to us, this course asks: what are the other ways of getting there? Possible components include: words, voices, platforms and publics. Requirements include active participation and written work. Letter grade only. (H2, PO)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL078 PO - Medieval Drugs

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2016.
    Instructor(s): J. Kirk
    Credit: 1

    It has been proposed that the basis of prehistoric religion (and indeed the origin of human consciousness itself) is the encounter with other worlds that can be brought on by certain hallucinogenic plants. In this seminar we will examine how archaic “techniques of ecstasy” survived, more or less underground, into the European Middle Ages, as well as inquire more generally into the nature and status of inebriation, poisoning, and visionary trance states. To be considered: love potions in medieval romances; the relations between mystical experiences and plant-derived ecstasies; the use of hallucinogens (mandrake, belladonna, etc.) by “witches”; the history of medicine and alchemy; dream visions and astral travel; the pursuit of stupor. Authors may include: Chretien de Troyes, Hildegard of Bingen, B’roul, Julian of Norwich, Abu Nawas, Marie de France, Fernando de Rojas, Walter Benjamin, and the Popol Vuh.
      
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL086 PO - Poetry Movements since the 1950s

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): P. Sharma
    Credit: 1

    This course will be a survey of the major poetic movements in the last half-century. Poets will include Ashbery, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Wright, Rich, Lorde, Creeley, Duncan and others. Letter grade only. (H5)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL086 PO - Poetry Movements Since the 1950s

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): P. Sharma
    This course will be a survey of the major poetic movements in the last half-century. Poets will include Ashbery, O’Hara, Ginsberg, Wright, Rich, Lorde, Creeley, Duncan and others. Letter grade only. May be repeated once for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
  •  

    ENGL087F PO - Writing: Theories/Processes/Practices

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Theoretical grounding in the writing process, as well as in teaching and tutoring. Students will undertake a major research project, investigating some aspect of the writing process, writing in a particular discipline or tutoring writing. Full course. (E)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    ENGL087H PO - Writing: Theories/Processes/Practices

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Theoretical grounding in the writing process, as well as theoretical and practical application of teaching and tutoring pedagogies. Students will regularly critically reflect on course readings in writing, as well as lead class discussion. For students currently working with writers at any level. (E) P/NC only.
  
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    ENGL089A PO - American Modernism

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): E. Kindley
    Credit: 1

    This course will provide an introduction to some of the key works of American experimental literature published between 1900 and 1930. Authors may include T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Henry James, Marianne Moore, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, Jean Toomer, and William Carlos Williams. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    ENGL091 PO - Enlightenment, Romantic and Victorian Literature

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): S. Raff
    Credit: 1

    Close study in historical context of selected works by such 18th- and 19th-century writers as Swift, Pope, Fielding, Johnson, Austen, Wordsworth, Keats, Bronte, Browning, Dickens, G. Eliot, Hardy and Yeats. (H3, H4, GS)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
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    ENGL093 PO - Rock and Roll Writing

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): K. Dettmar
    Credit: 1

    Combining study and practice, we’ll read some of rock’s most popular and vital writers (Bangs, Marcus, Powers, Willis, Klosterman) and produce writing in a number of common genres of rock writing. Five graded assignments of varying lengths. Writing workshop format. Letter grade only. (E)
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6; Writing Intensive
 

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