2020-21 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    Jun 27, 2022  
2020-21 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

Courses


Check major and minor requirement sections in the Departments, Programs and Areas of Study section to determine if specific courses will satisfy requirements. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the course will necessarily satisfy a requirement.

Click here  to view a Key to Course Listings and Discipline codes.

 

Chicano/a-Latino/a Studies

  
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    CHST121 CH - Artivistas in the Americas


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST125 CH - Latinxs in the 20th Century

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): T. Summers Sandoval
    Credit: 1

    A reading seminar focused on the diverse histories of Latinas/os in the twentieth century United States. With the goal of building depth of knowledge within a comparative framework, students will read new and classic works and engage each other in critical discussion on a range of topics, including: migration; community formation; U.S. radical ideologies; labor; gender and sexuality; and the internal diversity of Latinx people in the U.S. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    CHST126B CH - Contemporary Chicanx Literature


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST128 CH - Latinx Citizenship: Race, Rights and Resistance

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Zimmerman
    Credit: 1

    This course examines the normative and political dilemmas of citizenship and belonging through the lived experiences of Latino/a communities in the United States. Citizenship is typically thought of as state-granted universal membership in the national community with a guarantee of equality through civil, political, and social rights. However, citizenship is also a terrain of social struggle in which marginalized groups contest their exclusion. Historically, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other non-Whites have been restricted from full and equal standing in the nation. The high growth-rate of Latino/as since the 1970s has further challenged the notion of liberal inclusion. The key issue of undocumented migration and controversies over ‘illegality’ further complicate the significance of Latino citizenship within the borders of the United States. This class will incorporate interdisciplinary scholarship, focusing on how Latino/as have claimed rights in the shadow of citizenship. We will draw from legal and political theory, feminist theory, and critical race theory, as well as ethnographies and case studies that surface how citizenship is enacted and embodied. By the end of the course, students will understand the origins of nation-state citizenship, the role that race, gender, class, and labor played in shaping the legal parameters of American citizenship. Students will also be able to analyze how globalization, migration, and U.S. foreign and economic policies have challenged and transformed citizenship. Finally, students will analyze the different ways that subaltern communities have redefined citizenship through in their daily lives.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CHST130 CH - (Re)Claiming Voices & Sharing Stories in Chicanx Latinx Communities

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): G. Ochoa
    Credit: 1

    Drawing on Chicana-Latina feminisms, this course centers story-telling as (1) a method to (re)claim Chicanx-Latinx voices and histories in multiple spaces and institutions, including families and communities; and (2) as a form of everyday resistance and institutional transformation. Along with reading and discussing the latest books on Chicana-Latina voices and testimonials, students will complete oral histories and collectively build spaces to publically share stories and the lessons learned from their (re)search. Prerequisites: Any Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CHST132 CH - Immigrant Youth: Education, Access, and Activism

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Zimmerman
    Credit: 1

    This course explores the lives of immigrant and first-generation youth, with an emphasis on political organizing, activism, and advocacy related to higher education, immigrants’ rights, immigrant detention, and criminalization. Other topics will include the historical production of the undocumented population in the U.S., demographic trends, the educational, work, and family lives of immigrant youth, and the shifting policy terrain including the impact of DACA and its culmination. Students will have the opportunity to engage in a collaborative project to develop deeper knowledge about a single issue related to undocumented immigration and/or immigrant youth. This collaborative project may include qualitative research and/or a community-engaged learning project with the aim of helping students engage with the principles of social justice and collaborative leadership through critical reflection within the classroom. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CHST136 CH - Latinx Social Movements: Identity, Power, and Resistance

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Zimmerman
    Credit: 1

    Latin/o/a/xs have historically used grassroots community organizing and social movement participation to press for socio-political change. Yet, national discourse often falls back on stereotypes of Latino/as’ political apathy. This class will explore competing definitions of political participation. By doing so, we will interrogate how race, gender, class, ability and community shape the rates of, and the quality of political participation and activism amongst Latino/a/x communities. While various forms of activism such as union activism, anti-war activism, student activism, and civil rights activism all have appeared within the broader category of “Latino/a” social movements, we will pay special attention to the contemporary immigrants’ rights movement as exemplary of the modes of rights claiming practices that have defined Latino/a social movements historically.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CHST140 CH - Latinx Activism and Struggles for Sanctuary in the San Gabriel Valley

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): G. Ochoa
    Credit: 1

    Organized into two parts, this workshop-based class provides a collective space to learn about, document and engage with the current struggles for sanctuary in our local communities. During the first part of the semester, we will read and discuss approaches to community-based research and the 1980s sanctuary movement for Central Americans. Thereafter, we focus on the struggles for sanctuary cities and schools in the San Gabriel Valley and Inland Empire since the 2016 presidential election. Working together, we will collect, review, and analyze oral histories, city and school board minutes, newspaper articles, and sanctuary resolutions from cities such as Pomona, Claremont, La Puente, West Covina, San Dimas, Upland, Glendora, and San Gabriel. Some attention will also be given to current movements by local religious organizations. Our class will culminate in a co-created project that visually documents and helps to preserve these histories of struggle. Prerequisites: One course in Chicanx-Latinx Studies.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    CHST184D CH - Chicanx Short Fiction


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST185B CH - Narratives of U.S.- Mexico Borderlands


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST185C CH - Voices of the Tropics: Latina Literature of the Caribbean


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST186 CH - Contemporary Chicana Literature Seminar


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    CHST190 CH - Chicanx Latinx Studies Senior Seminar

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): M. Tinker Salas
    Credit: 1

    Under the guidance of the seminar instructor and the faculty readers, students write a senior paper. This paper serves as the foundation for writing a senior thesis, a performance, a project, a script or an exhibit. All students are expected to give an oral presentation of their work. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Writing Intensive
  
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    CHST191 CH - Chicanx Latinx Studies Senior Thesis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): M. Tinker Salas
    Credit: 1

    The independent research and writing project should culminate in substantial and original work. Directed by one faculty member, chosen by the student from the ICDCLS faculty. One additional reader must read each thesis. Students give an oral presentation of their work. The Chicana/o Latina/o senior thesis concludes undergraduate study and may only be taken during the senior year. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: CHST 190 CH .
  
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    CHST192 CH - Chicanx Latinx Studies Senior Project

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): M. Tinker Salas
    Credit: 1

    Students enrolled in the senior project seminar engage independent readings and research topics agreed upon by the student and the advisor. The final work can take the form of a performance, a project or an exhibit, including an original play, script, film or artwork. Students give an oral presentation of their work. The Chicanx Latinx senior project concludes undergraduate study and is taken during the spring semester of the senior year. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: CHST 190 CH .

Chinese

  
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    CHIN001A PO - Elementary Chinese

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): E. Cheng; Staff
    Credit: 1

    First-year course in the Chinese language. Conversation, pattern drills, reading and character-writing. CHIN 001A, each fall; CHIN 001B PO , each spring.
  
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    CHIN001B PO - Elementary Chinese

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): E. Cheng; Staff
    Credit: 1

    First-year course in the Chinese language. Conversation, pattern drills, reading and character-writing. CHIN 001A PO , each fall; CHIN 001B, each spring. Prerequisite: CHIN 001A PO .
  
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    CHIN002 PO - Elementary Chinese for Bilinguals

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): J. Zhou
    Credit: 1

    Designed for students with some oral proficiency in Chinese. Accelerated introduction to basic structure, which covers the CHIN 001A PO , CHIN 001B PO  sequence in a single semester. Intensive practice in reading and writing.
  
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    CHIN011 PO - Conversation: Contemporary Chinese Language and Culture

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Nakagoshi
    Credit: 0.25

    Open to all students except native speakers. Credit for satisfactory participation in Oldenborg Center activities and two conversation classes weekly. Prerequisite: CHIN 001B PO . Cumulative credit; graded P/NC. May be taken a total of four times for a total of one course credit.
  
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    CHIN013 PO - Chinese Conversation, Advanced

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Nakagoshi
    Credit: 0.25

    Open to all students except native speakers. Credit for satisfactory participation in Oldenborg Center activities and two conversation classes weekly. Cumulative, one-quarter course credit; graded P/NC. Does not satisfy the foreign language requirement. Limited to one enrollment per semester and a cumulative total of one course credit. Prerequisites: two years of college-level language study or equivalent and CHIN 051B PO .
  
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    CHIN051A PO - Intermediate Chinese

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff, J. Zhou
    Credit: 1

    Further study in the Chinese language, including reading, conversation, grammar, character-writing and composition. Prerequisite: CHIN 001B PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN051B PO - Intermediate Chinese

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): F. Xiao; J. Zhou
    Credit: 1

    Further study in the Chinese language, including reading, conversation, grammar, character-writing and composition. Prerequisite: CHIN 051A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN051H PO - Intermediate Chinese for Bilinguals

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. Zhou
    Credit: 1

    Further study in the Chinese language, especially intended for students with some oral proficiency in Chinese. Practice in speaking and listening, with particular emphasis on reading and writing skills. Covers equivalent of the CHIN 051A PO, CHIN 051B PO sequence in a single semester. Prerequisite: CHIN 002 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN111A PO - Advanced Chinese

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): A. Barr; F. Xiao
    Credit: 1

    Further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of modern texts, including essays, fiction, political writings and newspaper articles. Student discussion, translation and composition. Prerequisite: CHIN 051B PO  or CHIN 051H PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN111B PO - Advanced Chinese

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): F. Xiao
    Credit: 1

    Further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of modern texts, including essays, fiction, political writings and newspaper articles. Student discussion, translation and composition. Prerequisite: CHIN 111A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN121 PO - Digital News Reading in Chinese

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): F. Xiao
    Credit: 1

    This course aims to develop advanced-level learners’ ability to read news in Chinese covered by digital media and their ability to write argumentative essays. Readings will be authentic news in Chinese on a variety of topics such as environmental and social issues. In addition to learning topic-related vocabulary and grammar, students will improve their four proficiency subskills with a focus on reading and writing (two closely related subskills). Prerequisites: CHIN 111B PO  . May be repeated once for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    CHIN122 PO - Chinese in the Working World

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): F. Xiao
    Credit: 1

    This course adopts an intercultural perspective to explore cross-cutting issues in language etiquette and business culture. Students will improve their Chinese proficiency with a focus on their oral skills for communication, negotiation, and collaboration. They will also understand differences of appropriateness between Chinese and English at various business settings. Prerequisites: CHIN 111A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN125 PO - Modern Chinese Literature

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Hou
    Credit: 1

    Introduces students to 20th century literature of the May 4th era, the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan, through a close reading of selections from poetry, prose, fiction and drama. Further development of advanced speaking, listening and writing skills. Prerequisite: CHIN 111B PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement ; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CHIN127 PO - Advanced Readings in Modern Chinese Literature and Culture

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): E. Cheng
    Credit: 1

    Selected readings from modern and contemporary Chinese literature. Further development of advanced reading, speaking and writing skills. Prerequisite: CHIN 125 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN131 PO - Intro to Classical Chinese

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Hou
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of the literary language. Greater emphasis placed on lexicon and its integration into the modern language. Readings include simple extracts from early philosophy and history, as well as selections from Chinese prose and poetry. Written exercises and translations. Prerequisite: CHIN 111B PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN150 PO - Chinese Language in Society

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): F. Xiao
    Credit: 1

    Using a systematic evidence-based approach, the course addresses two inquiries: how social and cultural norms (e.g., social status, power relationship and social distance) affect the use of Chinese language; and how second language learners develop their ability to use Chinese appropriately in different contexts. Required readings will focus on current trends in Chinese linguistics and second language acquisition. All readings will be in English but with examples in Chinese. CHIN 051A PO  is the prerequisite for this course but no background in linguistics or statistics is required. Prerequisite: CHIN 051A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN179 HM - Special Topics: China


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    CHIN192A PO - Senior Project

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    A two-semester directed study of selected topics, culminating in a broad-ranging research paper or translation with contextual commentary and critical analysis. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: CHIN 111B PO .
  
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    CHIN192B PO - Senior Project

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    A two-semester directed study of selected topics, culminating in a broad-ranging research paper or translation with contextual commentary and critical analysis. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: CHIN 192A PO .
  
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    CHIN199DRPO - Chinese: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations, written papers and/or oral presentations equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    CHIN199IRPO - Chinese: Independent Research Project

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    A substantial and significant piece of original research produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.

Chinese Literature in Translation

  
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    CHNT164 PO - Poetry and Poetics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Hou
    Credit: 1

    A study of classical poetry in its historical and literary contexts. Readings from across a vast range of periods, forms, styles and themes. Critical methodology drawn from native Chinese aesthetics in the thought of Confucianism, Taoism and Zen Buddhism, as well as contemporary Western literary criticism. A segment devoted to women poets. Some attention to modern poetry. (Chinese in Translation)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    CHNT166 PO - Chinese Fiction, Old and New

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): A. Barr
    Credit: 1

    Examines classic works from China’s rich indigenous story-telling tradition, as well as notable achievements in 20th-century Chinese fiction. Readings include 17th-century love stories and tales of the supernatural, the great 18th-century novel of manners, The Dream of the Red Chamber, as well as recent works by contemporary authors. (Chinese in Translation)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    CHNT167 PO - Urban Imaginations: The City in Chinese Literature and Film

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): E. Cheng
    Credit: 1

    Explores the emergence of the city in popular imagination by juxtaposing different representations of the city in 20th-century Chinese fiction and cinema. Issues examined include configurations of time and space, gender and sexuality, love and alienation in the city, country vs. city and tradition vs. modernity. (Chinese in Translation)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CHNT168 PO - Gender and Sexuality in Modern Chinese Literature

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): E. Cheng
    Credit: 1

    Explores the representation of gender and sexuality by modern and contemporary male and female writers. Issues examined include the notion of “love,” intersection of feminism and nationalism, masculinity and power, gendering of race and class, sexuality and commercialism. (Chinese in Translation)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
  
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    CHNT180 PO - The Craft of Translation

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Barr
    Credit: 1

    This literary translation workshop is designed for students interested in developing competence in translating literary works, into English, from any language other than English and in honing their editorial skills. In this course, students will conduct individual translation projects that will be discussed and revised over the course of the semester. Weekly readings will include some key texts in translation theory; essays by translators reflecting on their work; and a variety of literary texts alongside their existing translations. A reading competence in a language other than English is required.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    CHNT199DRPO - Chinese in Translation: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations, written papers, and/or oral presentations equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit. (Chinese in Translation)
  
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    CHNT199IRPO - Chinese Translation: Independent Reasearch Project

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full credit only. (Chinese in Translation)

Classics

  
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    CLAS001 PO - Greek and Roman Classics

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): C. Chinn
    Credit: 1

    Who were the Greeks? What was life like in ancient Rome? This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the ancient world that draws on literary and historical texts as well as material culture and archaeology.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
  
  
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    CLAS010 SC - Epic Heroes and Form in Pop Culture


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CLAS012 SC - Greek Tragedy


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CLAS014 SC - Ancient Comedy


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CLAS018 SC - The Ancient Novel and Romance


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CLAS019 SC - The Ancient World in Film


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    CLAS022 PO - Epic: Gods and Heroes

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2017.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Epic poetry educated, validated and entertained ancient audiences from Greek mountainsides to the city of Rome and beyond. Our discussions will explore the heroes, gods and empires that populate these texts to better understand the cultures that both produced and consumed them. We will also examine how and why modern authors from a variety of socio-political, ethnic and cultural contexts continue to engage Greco-Roman epic. Previously offered as CLAS010.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
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    CLAS064 PO - Gods, Humans and Justice in Ancient Greece

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan
    Credit: 1

    Focus on the fundamental questions in ancient Greek moral thinking, such as the following: What is the best kind of life for a human? Should I be good? Can I be good? Is morality objective, subjective or relative to one’s society? What is the relation between gods and humans? Are we at the mercy of fate?
  
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    CLAS101A SC - Intermediate Classical Greek


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    CLAS106 PO - The Art of Leadership in Ancient Greece

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    From the rage-filled rivalries of Homer’s heroes to the Hellenistic game of thrones launched by Alexander the Great, vigorous debates about the character and consequences of (good) leadership were a prominent feature of ancient Greek literature and politics (ca. 750-300 B.C.). Here, through close reading and discussion of battlefield harangues and Assembly deliberations, of despotic tyranny and democratic nudging, we will explore together the contours of these ancient Greek conversations as leadership evolved and eventually began to be theorized. Our seminar readings will include both modern scholarship and ancient sources, the latter drawn primarily from Homer’s Iliad, from the historiographies of Herodotus and Thucydides, and from the writings of the fourth-century scholar-warrior Xenophon (including his Socratic Memorabilia, his campaign memoir Anabasis, and his Cyropaedia, an extended meditation on the ideal leader). Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area1; Language Requirement
  
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    CLAS112 PO - Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    How did ancient Romans understand and experience gender and sexuality? What can we know about how sexuality and gender shaped the lived realities of historical Romans? How were normative models of gender and sexuality constructed and enforced in the Roman world? Do we have evidence of counter-cultural activity or gender/sexuality-based subcultures? In order to develop our own answers to these questions, we will conduct a theoretically-informed exploration of the intersections between gender, sexuality, ethnicity, social class, and political status in the ancient Roman world. We will draw on literary and material evidence, including poetry, medical texts, architecture, and visual art. By utilizing feminist and anti-racist approaches and actively making thoughtful comparisons with our own lived experiences, students in this course will become a community of scholars engaged in a meaningful inquiry into gender and sexuality in Ancient Rome and today.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    CLAS113 PO - History of Sexuality: The Classical World

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    History of Sexuality: the Classical World. The ancient Greeks and Romans categorized sexuality differently from modern Westerners. This course focuses on same-sex love, an area of maximal difference. Using ancient evidence – from literature, history, and art – as well as modern theories, we will study the history of sexuality in the Classical cultures. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Speaking Intensive
  
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    CLAS114 PO - Female and Male in Ancient Greece

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    Using evidence from literature, oratory, law, medical writings and the visual arts, this course will explore the legal and social position of women in ancient Greece; male attitudes toward women and the idea of the Female; sexuality; and the contrast between the myths of powerful women and the apparent reality.
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
  
  
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    CLAS115 PO - The Politics of Persuasion in Democratic Athens

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    Argument was the beating heart of Athens’ radical democracy. Whether within the Assembly and law courts or out on the Street, Athenians were constantly arguing about their shared values and the political implications of those values. In this course we will read selections from contemporary authors (including Aristophanes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Lysias, and Demosthenes) as we explore the robust rhetoric and the real results of these democratic debates within classical Athens (ca. 594-­322 B.C.E.). There will be a strong emphasis on critical engagement with texts and contexts drawn from across the Athenian experience as well as their modern scholarly reception. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
  •  

    CLAS116A PO - Philosophy of Education

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    In this course, we will study foundational texts in the history of philosophy in order to become philosophers of education ourselves. We will read works by Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, Friere, and hooks inter alia, asking questions about human nature, the aims and means of education, and how educational models both reflect and transform society. Finally, we will develop our own pedagogical stances, answering for ourselves the key questions of the course. What are the aims of an education? How do we go about achieving those aims? In particular, (to speak directly to our place in a liberal arts college), what is the value of studying the humanities, the arts, and sciences, both historically and today.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
  •  

    CLAS117 PO - Archaeology and Society

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    Who owns the past? What are the aims of archaeology? How have the motivations and methods of early archaeologists and collectors defined what we know now? Could current projects radically transform our understanding of the ancient world? In this course, we will work together as an intellectual community to deepen our understanding of ethical issues raised by the practices of archaeology, museology, and the collection and display of material culture. We will begin by studying several archaeological projects and artifact collections from the ancient Mediterranean, including Troy, Knossos, the Parthenon Marbles, and the antiquities collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu. Students will then identify, research, and present relevant case studies of signficant interest to the students themselves. By applying diverse theoretical models, including actor-network modeling, thing theory, decoloniality, and feminism, we will develop our own methodologies for the study of archaeology in social context.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Speaking Intensive
  
  
  
  •  

    CLAS150BEPZ - The Roman Empire in the East


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
  •  

    CLAS161 PZ - Greek Art and Archaeology


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
  •  

    CLAS162 PZ - Roman Art and Archaeology


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
  •  

    CLAS164 PZ - Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
  
  
  •  

    CLAS181A SC - Advanced Latin Readings


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  
  •  

    CLAS182B SC - Advanced Greek Readings


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  •  

    CLAS190 PO - Senior Seminar in Classics

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    A seminar for review and discussion of major topics in Greek and Roman literature and civilization and directed study for majors in the process of completing senior exercise.
  
  •  

    CLAS191 PO - Senior Thesis in Classics

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An independent research and writing project supervised by a member of the Classics department faculty and read by one additional reader. Students work on an individual basis with faculty to identify a topic and become familiar with relevant bibliography and research methods. After one or more drafts critiqued by their supervisor or other faculty members, the students present the results of their research in writing and make an oral presentation to the department. Full course.
  
  •  

    CLAS192 PO - Senior Project

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An independent project supervised by a member of the Classics department and evaluated by one additional reader. Students work on an individual basis with faculty to define the project and become familiar with relevant bibliography and appropriate research methods, After meeting regularly with faculty to discuss progress, the students present the results of their research in writing or, if appropriate, in another medium and make an oral presentation to the department. Full course.
  
  •  

    CLAS199DRPO - Classics: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
  •  

    CLAS199IRPO - Classics: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
  •  

    CLAS199RAPO - Classics: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Research Assistantship. Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.
  
  •  

    GREK022 PO - Introductory Classical Greek Accelerated

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim; C. Chinn; J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    An accelerated introduction to ancient Greek grammar and syntax for beginning students. Successful completion of this one-semester course will help prepare students to read Classical Greek authors such as Plato and Xenophon in intermediate-level courses. The course will also prepare students to read New Testament texts. Previously offered as CLAS052  PO.
  
  •  

    GREK033 PO - Intermediate Greek

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan; B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    Second and third semester of Greek, emphasizes reviewing Greek grammar and learning to read standard Classical Greek authors. Prerequisite: GREK 022 PO , or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Previously offered as CLAS101A PO and CLAS101B  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GREK044 PO - Advanced Greek Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan; D. Roselli
    Credit: 1

    Great works of Greek prose and poetry selected from major authors, genres and periods. Authors and topics may include Homer, the Archaic Age, Greek tragedy, Greek historians, Greek rhetoric, Aristophanes, Plato and Aristotle. Each semester may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: GREK 033 PO  or permission of instructor. May be repeated four times for credit. Previously offered as CLAS182A PO and CLAS182B PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GREK104 PO - Readings in Koine Greek

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 0.5

    Koine Greek was the common language of the Eastern Mediterranean during the Hellenistic and Roman eras. This course allows students to hone their skills by translating selections from important Koine texts (the Septuagint and the New Testament) and authors (such as Philo and Josephus). Prerequisites: GREK 022 PO  or permission of instructor. P/NC only. Half-credit. May be repeated for credit. Previously offered as CLAS104  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
  •  

    LATN022 PO - Introductory Latin Accelerated

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): C. Chinn
    Credit: 1

    Accelerated introduction to Latin grammar, in one semester. No previous experience with Latin required. Course will prepare students for LATN 033 PO . Previously offered as CLAS032  PO.
  
  •  

    LATN033 PO - Intermediate Latin

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): C. Chinn; E. Finkelpearl; J. Valentine
    Credit: 1

    For students with two or three years of secondary school Latin or one year of college Latin. Selections from Latin poetry and prose of the late Republic and early Empire. Reading and translation from texts; grammar review and composition. Prerequisite: LATN 022 PO , or permission of instructor, or Latin placement test results; test results valid for one year. Previously offered as CLAS100  PO, CLAS110  PO, and CLAS112  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
  •  

    LATN044 PO - Advanced Latin Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): C. Chinn; E. Finkelpearl
    Credit: 1

    Great works of Latin prose and poetry from the writings of the major authors of the Roman Republic and Empire. May include the Roman letter, satire, lyric poetry, historians, drama, philosophy, elegiac poets or Lucretius. Prerequisites: LATN 033 PO  . May be repeated four times for credit. Previously offered as CLAS181A PO and CLAS181B PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  •  

    LATN103 PO - Readings in Medieval Latin

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): K. Wolf
    Credit: 0.5

    Latin survived for centuries after the decline of the Roman Empire as the political, intellectual and ecclesiastical language of medieval Europe, yielding a huge corpus of works, many of which remain untranslated today. This course provides students the chance to hone their skills by producing original translations of medieval texts. P/NC grading only. Prerequisite: one year of Classical Latin or the equivalent, or LATN 022 PO . May be repeated 4 times for credit. Previously offered as CLAS103  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement

Cognitive Science

  

Computer Science

  
  •  

    CSCI005 HM - Introduction to Computer Science


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI051 CM - Introduction to Computer Science


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI051A PO - Introduction to Computer Science Exploring Topics in Artificial Intelligence

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): D. Kauchak; A Papoutsaki; J. Osborn; Staff
    Credit: 1

    An introduction to computer science exploring topics in artificial intelligence (AI). The course will cover core programming concepts including iteration and recursion, basic data structures, and object-oriented programming using Python motivated by AI applications such as problem solving via search, game playing and basic machine learning. Students must take a lab associated with this section only. No previous programming experience required or expected. Course is equivalent to CSCI051 PO, CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051J PO , CSCI 051P PO , and CSCI 005 HM . Only one of the following courses: CSCI051 PO, CSCI051A PO, CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051J PO , CSCI 051P PO , and CSCI 005 HM , can be taken for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI051G PO - Introduction to Computer Science in Grace with Laboratory

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): K. Bruce
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the field of computer science using the new object-oriented language Grace. Topics include iteration and recursion, basic data structures, sorting and searching, elementary analysis of algorithms and a thorough introduction to object-oriented programming. Special emphasis on graphics, animation and event-driven programming to make more interesting programs. No previous programming experience required. This section of CSCI051x PO uses a new object-oriented programming language designed to make it easier for novices to learn to program. It provides better support for more modern programming language features and provides a strong background to learn other languages. Students must take the lab associated with this section only. Course is equivalent to CSCI 051A PO CSCI 051J PO , CSCI 051P PO , and CSCI051  PO. Only one of the following courses: CSCI 051A PO , CSCI 051J PO , CSCI 051G PO, CSCI 051P PO , CSCI051 PO, and CSCI 005 HM  can be taken for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI051J PO - Intro to Computer Science in Java with Laboratory

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): Y. Chen; M. Greenberg; Y. Wu; Staff
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the field of computer science using the object-oriented language Java. Topics include iteration and recursion, basic data structures, sorting and searching, elementary analysis of algorithms and a thorough introduction to object-oriented programming. Special emphasis on graphics, animation, event-driven programming and the use of concurrency to make more interesting programs. No previous programming experience required. The topics will be introduced using Java as the vehicle. Students must take the lab associated with this section only. Previously offered as CSCI051 PO. Course is equivalent to CSCI 051A PO CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051P PO , and CSCI051 PO. Only one of the following courses: CSCI 051A PO , CSCI 051J PO, CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051P PO , CSCI051 PO, and CSCI 005 HM , can be taken for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI051P PO - Introduction to Computer Science in Python with Laboratory

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): E. Birrell; Y. Chen; Staff
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the field of computer science using the Python programming language. Topics include iteration and recursion, basic data structures, sorting and searching, elementary analysis of algorithms, and an introduction to object-oriented programming. Special emphasis on working with and making sense of data in order to connect course material with applications in other disciplines. Students must take a lab associated with this section only. No previous programming experience required or expected. Course is equivalent to CSCI 051A PO CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051J PO , and CSCI051  PO. Only one of the following courses: CSCI 051A PO CSCI 051J PO , CSCI 051G PO , CSCI 051P PO, CSCI051 PO, and CSCI 005 HM , can be taken for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI052 CM - Fundamentals of Computer Science


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI052 PO - Fundamentals of Computer Science

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): E. Bull; D. Kauchak
    Credit: 1

    A solid foundation in functional programming, procedural and data abstraction, recursion and problem-solving. Applications to key areas of computer science, including algorithms and complexity, computer architecture and organization, programming languages, finite automata and computability. This course serves the same role as CSCI 060 HM  as a prerequisite for upper-division computer science courses at any of the Claremont Colleges. Prerequisites: any CSCI051x PO course. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI054 PO - Discrete Math and Functional Programming

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Greenberg, J. Osborn, Y.Wu
    Credit: 1

    A combined course on functional programming and formal proof. Students write programs over a variety of data structures, proving their programs correct with respect to precise logical specifications. Programming topics (and proof topics) range over: recursion (induction); combinatorics; algebraic data types, from lists to trees to abstract syntax trees (structural induction); parsers and interpreters (soundness properties); regular expressions (set theory and language theory). Prerequisites: any CSCI051x PO course or Computer Science AP Exam-A with a score of 5. The course is equivalent to CSCI 052 PO  plus CSCI 055 PO . This course and any of the following courses can not both be taken for credit: CSCI 052 PO , CSCI 055 PO , and CSCI 060 HM .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI055 PO - Discrete Mathematics

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the study of finite mathematical structures and the ways to build them, count them and analyze them. Topics and examples chosen to relate to concepts of interest in the design and analysis of computer algorithms, including permutations and combinations, graphs and trees and codes. Emphasis on creative problem solving and learning to read and write proofs. Prerequisites: any CSCI051x PO course. This course and CSCI 054 PO  can not both be taken for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI060 HM - Principles of Computer Science


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
  •  

    CSCI062 CM - Data Structures and Advanced Programming


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
 

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