2020-21 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    May 27, 2022  
2020-21 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

Courses


Check major and minor requirement sections in the Departments, Programs and Areas of Study section to determine if specific courses will satisfy requirements. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the course will necessarily satisfy a requirement.

Click here  to view a Key to Course Listings and Discipline codes.

 

Neuroscience

  
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    NEUR130 PO - Vertebrate Sensory Systems with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): K. Johnson
    Credit: 1

    Vertebrates possess remarkable adaptations for exploring their external environment. We will examine the senses of smell, taste, touch, vision and hearing at molecular, cellular and systems levels, with particular focus on the development of these systems. Topics will also include comparative anatomy, physiology, neural coding and exotic sensory systems. Prerequisite: NEUR 101A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
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    NEUR168 PO - Genes and Behavior with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): E. Glater
    Credit: 1

    This course will focus on genetic approaches used to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying various behaviors. We will examine several behaviors including aggression, anxiety, sleep and mating. In the laboratory students will learn current, genetic methods for studying behavior in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: NEUR 101A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4; Writing Intensive
  
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    NEUR178 PO - Neurobiology with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): K. Parfitt
    Credit: 1

    This course will focus on the biology of the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates with a cellular, molecular and electrophysiological approach. We will examine the ionic basis of electrical signaling in excitable cells, the physiology and biochemistry of synaptic transmission, the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory and selected hot topics in the field. Prerequisites: NEUR 101A PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4; Speaking Intensive
  
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    NEUR190 PO - Senior Seminar

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): J. King
    Credit: 0.5

    Critical analysis and discussion of the current research literature in neuroscience. Discussion of senior thesis exercise. Preparation of a critical literature review and an oral presentation describing thesis background. Topics vary each year. Senior majors only.
  
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    NEUR191 PO - Senior Library Thesis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    A non-empirical thesis in which students design a research protocol to answer an original question. Written in the form of a grant proposal. Half-course. May be taken in either semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: permission of instructor required.
  
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    NEUR192 PO - Neuroscience Senior Project

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. King
    Credit: 0.5

    Critical analysis and discussion of the current research literature in neuroscience. Discussion of senior thesis exercise. Topics vary each year. Senior majors only.
  
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    NEUR194A PO - Senior Experimental Thesis

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    An empirical thesis in which students undertake an experimental project that addresses an original question. Half-course each semester. NEUR 194A PO, each fall; NEUR 194B PO , each spring.
  
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    NEUR194B PO - Senior Experimental Thesis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An empirical thesis in which students undertake an experimental project that addresses an original question.
  
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    NEUR199DRPO - Neuroscience: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    NEUR199IRPO - Neuroscience: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Prerequisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    NEUR199RAPO - Neuroscience: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

Ontario Program

  
  
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    ONT105 PZ - Research Methods for Community Change


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL001 PO - Problems of Philosophy

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Green; Staff; P. Thielke
    Credit: 1

    A study of selected problems in philosophy, from such areas as ethics, philosophy of religion, theory of knowledge and metaphysics. Classical and contemporary readings.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
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    PHIL002 PO - Introduction to Ethics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): J. Tannenbaum
    Credit: 1

    The course surveys the major questions about ethics. How do we reason about specific moral problems, such as capital punishment, distribution of scarce resources and the value of life? Are ethical beliefs objective or are they relative to a person or culture? What is the motivation for moral theorizing?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL004 PO - Philosophy in Literature

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): S. Erickson
    Credit: 1

    Discussion of various aspects of the human condition, personal and social, as presented in various works of literature.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL005 PO - Gods, Humans and Justice in Ancient Greece

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2013.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan
    Credit: 1

    Focus on the fundamental questions in ancient Greek moral thinking, such as the following: What is the best kind of life for a human? Should I be good? Can I be good? Is morality objective, subjective or relative to one’s society? What is the relation between gods and humans? Are we at the mercy of fate? Letter grade only. Course is equivalent to CLAS 064 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL007 PO - Discovery, Invention and Progress

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini
    Credit: 1

    Discovery, Invention and Progress: Philosophy of Science and Technology. Introduction to the philosophy of science and technology. Addresses issues such as the difference between science and pseudoscience, how to facilitate objectivity and rationality in science and technology and evaluation of the neutrality thesis, the view that technology is a neutral instrument that can be used for good or ill.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL030 PO - Social Philosophy

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis
    Credit: 1

    This course examines philosophical questions that arise with respect to social institutions and societal norms, policies, and behaviors. Specific topics will vary, but may include disability, housing policy and segregation, felon disenfranchisement, and food policy. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
  
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    PHIL031 PO - Ethical Theory: Ancient to Early Modern

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): J. Tannenbaum
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to ethical theory through the major writings of several leading historical figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume and Kant. Among the topics we will discuss are: is acting virtuously necessary for living a good life; are a person’s motives relevant to whether an action is praiseworthy or blameworthy; can reason alone move us to act; and are moral judgments the result of reasoning or instead products of emotion? There are no pre-requisites for this class.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL032 PO - Ethical Theory: Contemporary

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): M. Green
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to contemporary (20th and 21st century) ethical theories, such as Consequentialism, Deontology and Virtue Theory as well as metaethical theories, such as subjectivism, relativism and nihilism. Among the topics we will discuss are: is there one true morality; how much good we must do for others, and at what costs to our own personal projects; does morality require that we be impartial, treating others equally, and if so, will this prevent us from being partial towards our friends and family; and can we really use ethical theory to guide our everyday decisions? There are no pre-requisites for this class.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL033 PO - Political Philosophy

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Green
    Credit: 1

    Classical and modern sources on the nature of the state, justice and rights. Addresses questions such as these: Should we have a state at all? What is a just society? What powers does the state have? Must individuals obey the state?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference; Writing Intensive
  
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    PHIL034 PO - Philosophy of Law

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis; M. Green
    Credit: 1

    Concerns the nature and substance of law. Addresses questions such as these: What is law? How should judges interpret the Constitution? When, if ever, is punishment justified? When does one private party commit a tort against another?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
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    PHIL035 PO - Well-being and Autonomy

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. Tannenbaum
    Credit: 1

    This course focuses on two important ethical values, well-being and autonomy and what to do when pursuit of one conflicts with the other. What makes someone’s life go better or worse? What if someone’s life can be made to go better or at least prevented from going worse but only at the cost of undermining that person’s autonomy, that is, by interfering with how the person has chosen to live her or his life? What if the greater good of a community requires limitations on personal freedoms or the infringement of the right not to be harmed? Possible contexts of conflict include sports, medicine, national security and war. There are no pre-requisites for this class.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL037 PO - Values and the Environment

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis
    Credit: 1

    Values & the Environment has a wider scope than an environmental ethics course. Specific topics to be discussed will vary, but will usually include examining the implications of choices in housing policies;  food and dietary decisions and practices, and the question of who (and what) has moral standing (only humans?  Humans and nonhuman animals?  Trees?  Mountains?  Ecosystems?). 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    PHIL038 PO - Bioethics

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis
    Credit: 1

    Focuses on issues and themes in the conduct of scientific research and the application of its results and about the nature and practice of medicine. One year we may explore the conceptual underpinnings that help us understand and assess the efficacy and morality of medical treatment. Another year, the orientation of the course may be more policy-centered.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL039 PO - Gender, Crime and Punishment (CP)

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): S. Castagnetto
    Credit: 1

    Addresses issues of crime and punishment focusing on gender, race and class. Topics include gender and crime; gendered aspects of punishment; women’s rights violations in prison; impact of the war on drugs, harsh sentencing and prison growth on women and their families; issues post-release; alternatives to incarceration. Community partnership with local state women’s prison.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL040 PO - Ancient Philosophy

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan
    Credit: 1

    Origins of Western philosophy through reading and discussion of its classical sources, including the Presocratics, Stoics, Epicureans, Sceptics, Plato and Aristotle.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
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    PHIL042 PO - History of Modern Philosophy

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): P. Thielke
    Credit: 1

    Major philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries (e.g., Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Leibniz, Hume), emphasizing their views on metaphysics, epistemology and philosophy of mind.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL043 PO - Continental Thought

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Erickson
    Credit: 1

    Beginning with a review of Kant, German idealism (Fichte through Hegel), Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Foucault and Derrida will be considered.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL045 PO - Philosophy of Gender

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): E. Anderson
    Credit: 1

    This course investigates the features and everyday impacts of gender from a philosophical perspective. Topics considered include: the relation of sex to gender; the nature of gendered oppression and its intersections with other forms of oppression; feminist and queer approaches to values and knowledge; and whether gender is a necessary or contingent feature of social relations.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL046 PO - Feminism and Science (CP)

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Castagnetto
    Credit: 1

    This course examines feminist perspectives on and critiques of science and technology, traditional scientific world views, and how gendered and other values inform scientific theory and practice.  Topics include the current and historical participation of women in science, with attention to race, class, and nationality; scientific theories of sex differences; the scientific construction of sex; issues in women’s health; and environmental issues.  This is a Napier course and will include participation of about 6 elders from the Pilgrim Place retirement community, offering an opportunity for intergenerational discussion and mentoring. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    PHIL047 PO - Socrates

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan
    Credit: 1

    Socrates wrote nothing but is one of the most famous philosophers of all time. We will explore this and other Socratic paradoxes - for example his claims that he did not know anything but was wiser than anyone he had ever met; that knowledge and virtue are the same thing; that no one knowingly or willingly does wrong; that it is better to be the victim of injustice than to be unjust; that a worse person cannot harm a better one. We will also investigate his claim to be the first genuine philosopher, his importance in the subsequent history of philosophy and his iconic place in human culture.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL052 PZ - Philosophy of Religion


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL054 PO - Existentialism

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): E. Anderson
    Credit: 1

    How does one find meaning in a seemingly meaningless world? This course approaches this question by means of a survey of existentialist thought from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including works by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, and Beauvoir. Topics include anxiety, freedom, subjectivity, and relations with others.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3;
  
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    PHIL057 JT - Philosophy of Technology: Our Technologies, Ourselves

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini
    Credit: 1

    The course investigates broad issues such as the nature of technology and our relationship to it, how technology affects the sense of self and community, its relationship to changing values and how technology is involved in how we think about the future and about the past. An additional goal of the course is to raise awareness of the invisible and ubiquitous technologies around us. Specific areas of focus may include social media, the quantified self-movement, surveillance and design.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL060 PO - Logic

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff; L. Perini
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to mathematical logic through the development of proof techniques (natural deduction and semantic tableaux) and model theory for sentential logic and quantification theory. Properties of logical systems, such as consistency, completeness and decidability.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 5
  
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    PHIL062 PZ - Chance and Scientific Reasoning


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL070 PO - Art and Aesthetics

    When Offered: Fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini
    Credit: 1

    The course will focus on issues concerning the nature of art and its value. Issues include the role of interpretation in determining the meaning of artworks; the question of whether forgery that is visually identical to an original work has less aesthetic—value and if so, why; and problems arising from certain kinds of artworks, like why we have emotional responses to fictional characters and whether it is rational to do so.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL071 PO - History of Aesthetics

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): P. Thielke
    Credit: 1

    A survey of various aesthetic theories, from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Topics will include the nature of beauty, the epistemological status of aesthetic judgments and the connection between art and morality. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, among others.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL080 PO - Philosophy of Mind

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    What can philosophers tell us about the mind? This course explores approaches—including scientific approaches—to explaining what the mind is. Can any of these views account for consciousness? Do they explain how thoughts can be about things? Do they allow that our mental states cause our actions? How can we know when something has a mind?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL081 PO - Epistemology: Truth, Justification, Knowledge

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    The facts seem to matter: Does the movie start at 7? Do the brakes on the school bus work? Should we teach evolution, creationism or both? But how do we know what the truth is? What makes some of our beliefs justified and others unjustified? Can we have any objective grasp on the truth?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL082 PO - Social Epistemology

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Much of what we know and believe about the world comes through social interactions. For example, we give and receive testimony, discuss questions with others, and hear and transmit rumors. Such interactions are not always helpful: think of wide-spread prejudices, propaganda, “fake news.” So how should we respond to and shape our social interactions if we want to improve our knowledge and understanding of the world? Possible topics include: testimony, disagreement, authority, rumors and gossip, open-mindedness, and epistemic injustice.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL084 PZ - Islamic Philosophy


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL096 JT - God and Philosophy: A Conflict in Reason


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL101 HM - History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL103 CM - Nietzsche


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL103 PO - Philosophy of Science: Historical Survey

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2016.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini; B. Keeley
    Credit: 1

    Theories about scientific reasoning and the nature of scientific knowledge have changed significantly since the scientific revolution. This course traces those developments, including key early modern figures like Bacon and Descartes, the Vienna Circle and early 20th-century logical positivism and the work of Thomas Kuhn, ending with more contemporary views, such as feminist philosophy of science. Prerequisite: College-level science or philosophy course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL104 HM - Hist of Phil:Contemporary Period


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL104 PO - Philosophy of Science: Topical Survey

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini; B. Keeley
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to a selection of topics in the philosophy of science, which might include the structure of scientific theories, the nature of scientific explanation, confirmation of scientific hypotheses, the difference between science and non-science, the reality of theoretical entities and contemporary critiques of science. Prerequisite: College-level science or philosophy course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL106 PO - Philosophy of Biology

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): L. Perini
    Credit: 1

    This course will address philosophical problems that revolve around clarifying what is required to do good science on living systems, and the explanatory tactics and methods that are distinctive to the life sciences. A focus of the course will be ways in which biology has been used as a means to understand humans, in terms of their evolutionary history and more recently, in terms of genetics. We will examine some of the distinctive concepts and theoretical resources of the life sciences, like the theory of natural selection, the concept of species, reductionistic explanatory strategies and methodological worries about adaptationism. The course will examine how these conceptual and methodological issues are involved in many of the aspects of the life science that concern categories of difference in human societies, like race and gender. Prerequisite: one college-level philosophy or biology course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference; Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL113 SC - Early Modern Philosophy: The Rationalists


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL120 PO - Metaphysics

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    This course is a study of basic issues concerning existence: What is there? What is it like? Possible topics include the relation of the mind and body, causation and indeterminacy and their implications for freedom, the nature of time, persistence through time, particulars and universals, necessity and possibility, and the nature of truth. Course is equivalent to PHIL126 CM.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL125 HM - Ethical Issues in Science and Engineering


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL140 HM - Environmental Philosophy


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL150 SC - Philosophy of Feminism


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL151 SC - Feminist Ethics


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    PHIL155 PZ - Islam vs. Islam


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    PHIL170 SC - Faith and Reason


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL185B PO - Topics in the Philosophy of Law

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Green
    Credit: 1

    An advanced course about topics in the philosophy of law such as the justification of punishment and the right to privacy.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL185L PO - Topics in Epistemology, Metaphysics and the Philosophy of the Mind

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An examination of various issues in contemporary epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. Topics may include the nature of consciousness, mental causation, the relationship between the mental and the physical, the nature of epistemic justification and the status of testimony as a source of knowledge. Prerequisites: a PHIL course. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
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    PHIL185N JT - Topics in Neurophilosophy


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL185P PO - Topics in Value Theory

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): J. Tannenbaum
    Credit: 1

    An examination of topics central to value theory, such as moral dilemmas, moral luck, the obligation to aid and not harm others and moral responsibility. Prerequisites: One of the following: PHIL 002 PO , PHIL 031 PO PHIL 032 PO , PHIL 035 PO  or their equivalent at another college.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    PHIL185Q PO - Topics in Applied Ethics

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis
    Credit: 1

    This course will look in depth at some applied ethics issues: drugs, reproductive ethics, philanthropy & altruism, etc. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: some philosophy background or another relevant normative background. May be repeated once for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL185S PO - Topics in Social and Political Philosophy

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): A. Davis; M. Green
    Credit: 1

    In this class, we will look at important roots and branches of the opioid crisis: What are some of the social, medical, philosophical, and institutional factors that have lead to the widespread and heavy use of these strong painkillers, and why has it proved so difficult to figure out how to change our paradigms and practices.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL186H PO - Topics in History of Modern Philosophy

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): P. Thielke
    Credit: 1

    An examination of issues central to 17th to 19th century philosophy. Topics might include the debate between rationalism and empiricism, the limits of reason, the nature of substance and mind and the nature of human experience. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: PHIL 042 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL186K PO - Kant

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): P. Thielke
    Credit: 1

    A detailed examination of the works of Immanuel Kant, focusing on issues that arise from Kant’s transcendental idealism. Topics may include Kant’s account of cognition, the nature and limits of human knowledge, the force of the moral law and the warrant of aesthetic judgment. Prerequisite: PHIL 042 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    PHIL187C PO - Tutorial in Ancient Philosophy

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): R. McKirahan
    Credit: 1

    Selected topics in ancient philosophy. Requires regular meetings with the instructor to discuss original texts, interpretations and the student’s written work. Sample topics: pre-Socratic philosophy, Socrates and the Sophists, Plato’s theory of forms, Aristotle’s philosophy of science, ancient ethical theories. May be repeated for credit. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: One course in ancient philosophy.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  
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    PHIL190 PO - Senior Literature Review

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Satisfies the senior exercise requirement for philosophy majors. Literature review of a philosophical issue. In consultation with faculty, each student selects a philosophical issue or question to investigate and researches a list of readings. The finished product is a comprehensive explanation of the current literature on the student’s topic. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Speaking Intensive
  
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    PHIL191 PO - Senior Thesis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An optional thesis supervised by a member of the philosophy department faculty, undertaken after the required senior exercise, PHIL 190 PO , is completed in the first semester.
  
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    PHIL199DRPO - Philosophy: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    PHIL199IRPO - Philosophy: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Prerequisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    PHIL199RAPO - Philosophy: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Research Assistantship. Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

Philosophy, Politics and Economics

  
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    PPE100 PO - Enrich, Enlighten, and Reform: Introduction to PPE

    When Offered: Each spring
    Instructor(s): M. Dold
    Credit: 1

    This course explores ways in which an understanding of moral philosophy can improve economic analysis, how moral philosophy can benefit from economists, analytical tools, and how economic analysis and moral philosophy together can inform public policy. We explore rationality and its connections to morality. Modes of economic analysis, including game theory, social choice theory, and welfare economics, are considered in conjunction with such notions as freedom, rights, equality, and justice, in order to address public policy issues. Prerequisites: ECON 052 PO  or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2
  
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    PPE160 PO - Freedom, Markets and Well-Being

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown; M. Green; A. Davis
    Credit: 1

    Our society embraces commitments both to safeguarding basic liberties and to facilitating the pursuit of happiness. This course examines the interplay of philosophy, politics and economics in social and political theory and explores scholarship that relates theory to issues of public concern such as health care policy and economic inequality. Prerequisites: ECON 102 PO  and one course in each of philosophy and politics. May be taken for the Pomona Economics Major and Minor. Offered each fall in which PPE 190 PO  is not offered.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 2; Writing Intensive
  
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    PPE190 PO - Senior Seminar

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2015.
    Instructor(s): E. Brown; M. Green
    Credit: 1

    Exposes students to scholarship that works across disciplinary boundaries in the fields of philosophy, politics and economics. Attention is paid to theoretical discourse and to policy applications. The course prepares PPE majors to write an integrative senior thesis and is designed to be taken prior to or concurrently with the senior thesis. Offered each fall in which PPE 160 PO  is not offered.
  
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    PPE195 PO - Senior Exercise

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    A thesis that is original and integrates at least two of the participating disciplines, including the student’s discipline of primary focus. Faculty readers for theses shall be drawn from the departments concerned.
  
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    PPE199DRPO - Philosophy Politics and Economics: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    PPE199IRPO - Philosophy Politics and Economics: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.

Physical Education

  
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    PE001 PO - Aerobics

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Ferguson
    Credit: 0.25

    A challenging, fun aerobic exercise class using bench/step aerobics set to music and including athletic and dance movements. Structured to develop cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance through safe and specific body conditioning exercises. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE001D PO - Cardio Kickboxing

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): S. Frescas
    Credit: 0.25

    This class offers a great workout for everyone interested in improving their fitness and having fun. This class is flexible to serve the needs of all students–it will help beginners to improve fitness, it will challenge the more fit, and it is popular with both men and women. Class format integrates large muscle movement to music and combinations of simulated punches and kicks. Additional muscle and motion exercises are incorporated to strengthen and tone. You will have fun, reduce stress, and get an awesome workout. P/NC only.  May be repeated for credit. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE002 PO - Pilates Method

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Gamans
    Credit: 0.25

    This class is designed for students with no previous or very little experience in Pilates. Pilates is an abdominally based workout that is designed to create postural strength focusing on the abdominal as well as the small intrinsic muscles that support our spinal column. The entire theory of Pilates is developed around the idea of lengthening the muscles as they contract. The innovative method of exercise demands intense focus on certain muscle groups while all the time engaging the abdominals. This type of activity increases strength and flexibility around the spinal column as well as other major muscle groups. The practice of Pilates is designed to stimulate the proper neurological innervation to create a deeper sense of symmetry. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE002C PO - Pilates Reformer

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Gamans
    Credit: 0.25

    This class offers students the opportunity to deepen their mind/body connection, core strength and flexibility by learning the foundational exercises on the Pilates Reformer, the principal apparatus used in learning The Pilates Method. Some experience in either Pilates Matwork, Reformer work (or both) is highly encouraged. P/NC grading only. Course may be repeated 8 times for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE003 PO - Introduction to Fitness

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Scanlon; S. Queener; M. Morgan
    Credit: 0.25

    This course gives students a chance to experience many forms of physical activity, including but not limited to, cardio, weight training, core training, yoga, pool workouts, circuit training, and competitive sports (soccer, basketball). The variety of activities will enable students to assess their current level of physical fitness and determine what they enjoy doing for a workout. By the end of the course, students will be able to create their own workout plan to use in the future. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE004 PO - Tough Mudder Training

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Morgan
    Credit: 0.25

    The purpose of the Tough Mudder Training course is to introduce students to the growing sport of obstacle course racing.  Being that much of obstacle racing is meant to make you uncomfortable, physically and mentally, demanding tasks and exercises are incorporated into the training.  The course will include exercises and workouts that build your physical and mental preparation for being able to participate in a future Tough Mudder event.  P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE006 PO - Core Training

    When Offered: Fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): S. Queener; Z. Hubbard
    Credit: 0.25

    This class is designed for students with no previous experience in core training. A variety of exercises and equipment will be used to target your core muscle groups. These muscle groups will be targeted from different planes of motion and angles to increase our results. The round, mobile surface of the fitness ball requires the core muscles to maintain balance, therefore making them work harder throughout the exercises; The Bosu Balance Trainer adds yet another physical challenge to the training of your core muscle groups; and finally, weights will be used as another means of training in this course. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE006B PO - TRX-Total Body Resistance

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): V. Townsend
    Credit: 0.25

    TRX leverages gravity and your bodyweight to perform hundreds of exercises. You’re in control of how much you want to challenge yourself on each exercise - because you can simply adjust your body position to add or decrease resistance. This work-out delivers an effective total-body workout; helps build a solid core, increases muscular endurance and benefits people of all fitness levels. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE007 PO - Triathlon Training

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): J. Gowdy
    Credit: 0.25

    The course will be an introduction to Triathlon specific training (a combination of Swimming, Biking, Running & Transitions). It is designed to provide students with the skills and training to complete a sprint distance triathlon at the end of the semester (1/4 mile swim, 12 mile bike, 3.1 mile run). Bicycles will be available to borrow. Prerequisites: Intermediate swimming skills. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.

      


     


    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education

  
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    PE008 PO - Conditioning - Advanced

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Walsh
    Credit: 0.25

    Advanced Conditioning utilizes a number of different athletic movements to develop athletic ability, kinetic awareness, and overall conditioning. Using plyometrics, running, jumping, body awareness, stretching, and other training devices, we seek to expose students from all backgrounds and interests to proper training protocols that can be used for a lifetime. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE009 PO - Jogging/Running

    When Offered: Fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): K. Reynolds; J. Ferguson, J. Carpenter
    Credit: 0.25

    This course will teach the basics of running with an emphasis on learning to train and run wisely. The overall goal is to teach you have to incorporate running as a part of your overall fitness and health regimen. You will learn how to gradually build your endurance. Strength training, stretching, and injury prevention will also be covered. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE009A PO - Walking - Get Your Steps In

    When Offered: Each Semester.
    Instructor(s): W. Swartz
    Credit: 0.25

    Walking is a great way to get the physical activity needed to obtain health benefits. Walking does not require any special skills, a gym membership or expensive equipment. A single bout of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity can improve sleep, memory, and the ability to think and learn. It also reduces anxiety symptoms. The CDC recommends getting 150 minutes per week of physical activity, this class will help achieve at least 110 minutes of much needed exercise. There will be a gradual increase in the distance or time goals for each class. P/NC grading only. May be repeated 8 times for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE010 PO - Hiking/Geocaching

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): K. Reynolds, J. Ferguson
    Credit: 0.25

    Geocaching is a real-world, outdoor treasure-hunt game using GPS-enabled devices. Students navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location. Geocaching combines hiking (in the local foothills and area parks) and searching for geocaches, which vary in size from micro to ammo cans. The hikes increase in intensity as the class progresses. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE011 PO - Outdoor Leadership

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): M. Crawford
    Credit: 0.5

    The Outdoor Leadership course teaches technical and facilitation skills required in an Outdoor Leadership role while traveling in the backcountry with groups. These skills include evaluating the history, philosophy, and trends in outdoor adventure programming. Emphasis is given to environmental ethics and trends of access issues as it relates to historically underrepresented populations in outdoor recreation. Technical skills taught include use of outdoor equipment while using the outdoors as s laboratory for specific activities: (spring) rock climbing, caving, winter mountaineering and (fall) kayaking, snorkeling, backpacking, and survival, The course consists of approximately 80 classroom and field trip instruction hours. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE011A PO - Ropes Course and Leadership Training

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): C. Weyant; M. Crawford
    Credit: 0.25

    Challenge courses create more accessible “pinnacle” experiences and have the potential to increase self-efficacy and self-esteem for their participants. This course is an introduction to facilitating such experiences. Specifically, students will learn and apply the technical, safety, leadership and facilitation skills essential to safe and effective ropes course programming. Emphasis is given to understanding the technical and interpersonal components of challenge course facilitation . With respect to Analyzing Difference, class discussions will include outdoor recreation participation among traditionally marginalized communities and accessibility for differently abled bodies. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE015 PO - Swim Fitness

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Rodriguez
    Credit: 0.25

    Introduction to swim fitness: Pool rules/safety rules; benefits of swimming. Design a swimming workout: selecting different yardage, strokes, and sets for training. Increasing knowledge and adding variety: proper swimming technique and terminology; video will be used to teach. Timed events: test sets will be used to gauge improvements. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE016 PO - Weight Training

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Pace; F. Pericolosi; J. Scanlon; W. Swartz; A. Rodriguez; J. Ferguson; C. Katsiaficas
    Credit: 0.25

    In this class, students will learn how to: practice proper and safe use of resistance training equipment; learn major muscle groups of the human body and exercises that can effectively strengthen them; utilize the principles of weight training to develop an effective, personalized workout program; improve overall flexibility, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE018 PO - Weight Training and Cardio

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Scanlon; K Reynolds; J. Ferguson; A. Rodriguez
    Credit: 0.25

    It is the goal of this class to introduce the student to basic fitness and wellness concepts and to provide exposure to a wide variety of cardio, respiratory, and weight training methods. Each class period will include exercises to improve flexibility, cardio respiratory fitness, and muscular strength and endurance. Cardio respiratory activities may include walking and jogging (both outside and on a treadmill), hiking, stationary biking, stair climbers, rower, elliptical cross trainer, rope skipping, and water exercises. Muscular strength and endurance exercises may include machines, free weights, balls and bands, as well as gravitational resistance and functional training exercises. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
  
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    PE019 PO - Circuit Strength Training

    When Offered: Fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): J. Pace; S. Queener; M. Morgan
    Credit: 0.25

    This course utilizes circuits as a means to build strength, speed, endurance, and flexibility. During circuits, students move from station to station completing different exercises, with the exercises performed using short bursts of energy and minimal rest. Elements of strength training, agility and plyometric work, cardio, yoga, and core training, among others, will be completed during the circuits. P/NC only. May be repeated for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Physical Education
 

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