2015-16 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    Sep 29, 2022  
2015-16 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

New and Revised Courses


New Courses for 2015-16


Revised Courses for spring 2016


ART 128  PO. Installation: Site, Time, Context. M. O’Malley. Loosely categorized under the headings of site, time and context we will explore a range of different practices and expressions that constitute installation art work. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: Any 5C Art course. May be repeated for credit.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

ECON166  PO. Advanced Topics in Banking. M. Zemel. The course will introduce students to the unique nature of financial intermediaries, with a focus on commercial banks. We will examine the role that these institutions play in the economy, the risks they face, and the general approaches taken by both banks and regulators to manage these risks. The course will include a module on modern, quantitative methods to measure financial risks. In addition, the course will highlight current policy questions regarding the role of financial institutions in our economy. Prerequisites: ECON057  PO, ECON156  PO or ECON157  PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each spring.

 

ENGL055A PO. Impossible Novels: The Man Without Qualities. J. Lethem. In the poet Randall Jarrell’s definition, “a novel is a prose narrative of a certain length with something wrong with it”. The Austrian Modernist Robert Musil’s THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES, an unfinished novel of 1700 pages in its most comprehensive edition, is an exemplary case of the above. Musil is often classed with Proust and Joyce in the 20th Century pantheon; he’s also rarely read. In this seminar we’ll tackle this vast book directly and by using a number of historical and critical sources, as well as Musil’s diaries, to surround and inform it with useful context. The result will be a reading expedition to an unknown shore. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2016.

 

HIST141  PO. Environmental Histories of the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa. A. Khazeni. The history of changing human interactions with the natural world in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Traces how natural phenomena and resources have shaped patterns of society and the cultural meanings and perceptions attached to nature. The course considers how these human interactions and attitudes toward the natural world have altered environments and landscapes globally, and the ecological consequences of these changes in the land. Letter grade only. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East)

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

PHIL033  PO. Political Philosophy. M. Green. Classical and modern sources on the nature of the state, justice and rights. Addresses questions such as these: Should we have a state at all? What is a just society? What powers does the state have? Must individuals obey the state?

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

PHYS165  PO. Introduction to Physical Hydrodynamics. D. Whitaker. This course introduces the ideas underlying fluid mechanics using a fundamental physical approach. It discusses transport coefficients of fluids, the kinematics of continuous media, conservation laws and potential flow. Finally, it concludes with a treatment of vorticity and vortex dynamics, flow at low Reynolds numbers – including suspensions and porous media, boundary layers and hydrodynamic instabilities. Letter grade only. Corequisite: PHYS125  PO or 5C equivalent.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

PSYC133  PO. Fieldwork in Clinical Psychology (CP). J. Borelli. Integration of theory with personal experience in a clinical or applied behavior setting. Practical training in listening skills and the observation and understanding of human behavior. Enrollment by permission only. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: PSYC131  PO or PSYC132  PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

PSYC153  AA. Asian American Psychology. S. Goto. Introduces students to salient psychological issues of Asian Americans. Taking into account the social, cultural and historical context of the Asian American experience, addresses values and cultural conflict in values, stereotypes and self-perception, family and intergenerational issues, identity development, acculturation, marriage and gender roles, vocational development, psychopathology and delivery of mental health services. Prerequisites: PSYC051  PO or an ASAM course.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Spring 2016.

 

PSYC180D PO. Seminar in Affective Neuroscience. A. Satpute. The affective neuroscience seminar will examine the psychological and neural basis of emotion, the role of ‘top-down’ processes in emotion such as language and cognitive control, and individual differences across development, healthy adults, and clinical populations. Some questions we will explore are: Why do some people excel at understanding thoughts and feelings more than others, while others have major difficulties doing so? What is the basis of so-called intuitions, the ‘it’ factor, charm, or charisma? What does neuroscience tell us about the nature of emotions? Students should be interested in psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. A background of at least two previous classes in at least one of these fields is recommended. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: Either PSYC051  PO or NEUR101  PO. Recommended: Any one additional course in PSYC or NEUR.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each spring.

New Courses for 2016-17


Revised Courses for 2016-17


ARHI051B PO. The Medieval Mediterranean. P. Blessing. Asks how the visual cultures of past times relate to those of the present. Critically examines the modern notion of “art.” Proceeds chronologically and globally with examples from Europe, Africa, the Americas and Asia. Courses may be taken in any order. ARHI051A PO: Prehistory through ancient times in Europe, the Mediterranean and the Fertile Crescent. ARHI051B PO: The Medieval Mediterranean. ARHI051C PO: Renaissance to Modern.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

BIOL001D PO. Ecology for Non-Majors with Laboratory. F. Hanzawa. Introduction to the major concepts of population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Topics include demography; factors governing population growth; predator-prey, competitive, and mutualistic interactions; and the structure of biological communities. Not intended for science majors. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2016.

 

CHIN002 PO. Elementary Chinese for Bilinguals. J. Wu. Designed for students with some oral proficiency in Chinese. Accelerated introduction to basic structure, which covers the CHIN001A PO, CHIN001B PO sequence in a single semester. Intensive practice in reading and writing.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each fall.

 

CLAS018 PO. Love and Identity in the Roman Empire. S. Eccleston. In this course we will investigate how authors of fictional texts from the 1-3rd centuries A.D. constructed their characters’ class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality, and therefore reflect concerns about wisdom, power and difference in the Roman Empire. Prerequisites: Any course in GWS, ENGL, or CLAS; or HIST010 PO, HIST101 PO, HIST103A CM, or HIST108 CM.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

CLAS032 PO. Introductory Latin Accelerated. C. Chinn. Accelerated introduction to Latin grammar, in one semester. No previous experience with Latin required. Course is the equivalent of both CLAS008A PO and CLAS008B PO. Course will prepare students for CLAS 100 PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

CSCI131 PO. Programming Languages. M. Greenberg. A thorough examination of issues and features in language design and implementation, including language-provided data structuring and data-typing, modularity, scoping, inheritance and concurrency. Compilation and run-time issues. Introduction to formal semantics. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: CSCI052 PO, CSCI062 PO, and CSCI081 PO (or the CMC equivalents); or CSCI060 HM, CSCI070 HM, and CSCI081 HM.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each fall.

 

CSCI151 PO. Artificial Intelligence. D. Kauchak. Introduction to artificial intelligence covering traditional topics such as state-space search and game playing, as well as more recent concepts including machine learning and a number of AI applications. Philosophical issues surrounding artificial intelligence and cognitive science will also be considered. Prerequisites: CSCI052 PO and CSCI062 PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Last offered fall 2014.

 

CSCI158 PO. Machine Learning. D. Kauchak. Machine learning focuses on discovering patterns in and learning from data. This course is an introduction to the most common problems in machine learning and to the techniques used to tackle these problems. Prerequisites: CSCI052 PO and CSCI062 PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

CSCI190 PO. Computer Science Senior Seminar. Staff. Reading, discussion and presentation of research papers in an area of computer science. Each student will write a survey paper and must regularly attend the Computer Science Colloquium. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: Senior standing and at least three CSCI courses numbered CSCI081 PO or higher.

Credit: 0.5

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

ECON165 PO. Advanced Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics. J. Clithero. This course surveys recent research in behavioral and experimental economics, and introduces students to the use of experiments in economics. The course will cover modern economic theories developed to explain human behavior, as well as experimental methods for testing economic theories. Students will critically evaluate the design and analysis of experiments in published papers and evaluate the implications of results for public policy. Student projects will include an empirical application of the behavioral phenomena learned in class. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ECON101 PO and ECON102 PO; ECON 107 PO or ECON167 PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2017.

 

ENGL087H PO. Writing: Theories, Processes, Practices. P. Bromley. Theoretical grounding in the writing process, as well as theoretical and practical application of teaching and tutoring pedagogies. Students will regularly critically reflect on course readings in writing, as well as lead class discussion. Half-credit. For students currently working with writers at any level. (E) Pass/No Credit only.

Credit: 0.5

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

GEOL015 PO. Living on the Edge: Earthquakes and Water in Southern California. L. Reinen. Shifting plates and shifting climate, especially with regards to water, are an integral part of the Southern California setting. In this introductory level course, students explore the tectonic and hydrologic challenges unique to southern Californians—where we are now and what might the future hold? Lectures, hands-on exercises, exams, field trip. Previously offered as GEOL 123 PO .

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each spring.

 

GEOL020G PO. Climate Change. R. Gaines. An integrated perspective of Earth’s dynamic climate through time. Students will explore the linkages of physical, chemical, biological and geological factors which regulate the Earth’s intricate climate system. Special emphasis to be placed on the geologic record of Earth’s climate and evaluation of anthropogenic influences on climate. Previously offered as GEOL 152 PO .

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2017.

 

GEOL129 PO. Geophysics. E. Grosfils. Introduction to geophysical techniques and their application to geological investigation of the subsurface at a variety of scales. Computer applications, hands-on field training and lectures provide insight into the principles of seismic, gravity, magnetic and other key geophysical methods. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: MATH030 PO and one course from the GEOL020 PO series. Previously offered as GEOL 155 PO .

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each fall.

 

GEOL185 PO. Structural Geology. L. Reinen. A study of the formation of rock structures from microscopic to continental scale. Topics include stress, strain, deformation mechanisms and the large-scale forces responsible for crustal deformation. Field trip. Co-enrollment in GEOL175 PO recommended. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: One course from GEOL125 PO, GEOL127 PO, GEOL129 PO, and GEOL131 PO. Corequisites: A second course from GEOL125 PO, GEOL127 PO, GEOL129 PO, GEOL131 PO, and GEOL175 PO.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Each fall.

 

HIST070 PO. Europe and the World 1492-1800. G. Kates. An introduction to European history between the Renaissance and the Napoleonic Wars that focuses on Europe’s connections with the rest of the world. Topics include the era of discovery and exploration, New World trade and settlement, slavery and the slave trade, imperial ambitions, as well as the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Thirty Years War, Absolute and Constitutional Monarchy, and the French Revolutions. (Core course, Europe Since the Renaissance).

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

HIST101 PO. Achilles to Alexander. B. Keim. This course explores the history of ancient Greece, from the wrath of Achilles to the campaigns of Alexander the Great, from the archaic world of Odysseus to the democratic splendors of Periclean Athens (ca. 1200 – 323 B.C.E.) There will be a strong emphasis on critical engagement with the entire range of primary sources – including the Homeric epics, the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, and the material and archaeological remains – and on the enduring historical, political, and cultural legacies of ancient Greece. (Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean) Letter grade only.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

HIST118 PO. Medieval Spain and the Idea of ‘Convivencia.’ K. Wolf. It is widely appreciated that Christians, Muslims, and Jews lived together (that is, experienced “convivencia”) for significant portions of medieval Spanish history and benefited materially and culturally from such proximity. Of late “convivencia” has become the focus of increased attention, as people in the post-9/11 world turn to history for signs of hope that Christians, Muslims, and Jews really can get along. In this course we will take a critical and nuanced look at the idea of “convivencia” and how it relates to the historical realities of medieval Spain. Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST 100WRPO .

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2017.

 

HIST119 PO. Earliest Christian Views of Islam. K. Wolf. Over the course of the century following Muhammad’s death in 632, Muslim armies dominated the eastern, southern, and western shores of the Mediterranean, areas that had been in Christian hands for centuries. How Christian commentators came to terms with this dramatic religio-political transformation of their world is the subject of this seminar. Primary sources from the hands of contemporary Greek, Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, and Latin Christian authors will be supplemented by the works of modern scholars. Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST 100WCPO .

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

HIST128 PO. United States Empire: 1890 to the present. V. Silverman. Has the United States created an “empire for liberty” as Thomas Jefferson hoped? This course provides ways to answer this question by exploring the US’ dramatic leap to preeminence and the nature of its global order. It introduces students to competing interpretations of momentous events in US foreign relations since the closing of the western frontier including: wars fought around the world, covert operations to control foreign governments, efforts to organize the world economy, and the spread of US political and cultural power.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

JAPN192  PO. Senior Research Paper. Staff. A one-semester directed study of selected topics, culminating in a broad-ranging research paper that will include translation of excerpts from texts. Half-course. Taken in either semester. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: Near completion of courses for the major. Corequisite: JAPN120  PO series; JPNT courses.

Credit: 0.5

When Offered: Each semester.

 

MUS 010 PO. Individual Instruction: Level I. Staff. Individual Instruction, Level I. Half-hour lesson weekly. P/NC only. Cumulative credit.

Credit: 0.25

When offered: Each semester.

 

MUS 042C PO. West African Music Ensemble. N. Agbeli. Introduction to West African percussion, singing, and dance, with an emphasis on Ghanaian Anlo-Ewe techniques and styles. Students have the opportunity to learn to play all the instruments in the ensemble. Participation in an end-of-semester public performance is required. P/NC only. Half course.

Credit: 0.5

When offered: Each fall.

 

PHIL002 PO. Introduction to Ethics. J. Tannenbaum. The course surveys the major questions about ethics. How do we reason about specific moral problems, such as capital punishment, distribution of scarce resources and the value of life? Are ethical beliefs objective or are they relative to a person or culture? What is the motivation for moral theorizing?

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Fall 2016.

 

SOC 090 PO. Global Systems and Society. C. Beck. Global and transnational sociology is one of the fastest growing areas of research on contemporary social problems. The course covers major sociological perspectives on transnational processes and the international dynamics of and effects on phenomena like civil society, economy, conflict, the environment and social change. Special emphasis on the parallels between historical and contemporary eras of globalization. The course is partially taught in tutorial style. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2016.

 

THEA115M PO. Race and Contemporary Performance. J. Lu. What is race and how does the meaning attached to racial categories shape culture and social structures in the United States? We will examine how individuals and groups use their bodies and minds to identify, de-identify, imagine and re-imagine racial dynamics in America via drama and performance.

Credit: 1.0

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2016.