2020-21 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    May 27, 2022  
2020-21 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

Courses


Check major and minor requirement sections in the Departments, Programs and Areas of Study section to determine if specific courses will satisfy requirements. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the course will necessarily satisfy a requirement.

Click here  to view a Key to Course Listings and Discipline codes.

 

French

  
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    FREN044 PO - Advanced French

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    Discussions of films, photographs and novels from France and Francophone culture. Interviews, songs, poetry and Web surfing. Development of skills and knowledge for living and studying abroad. Review of grammar. Emphasis on speaking. Course content varies. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN 033 PO  .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    FREN100 SC - French Culture and Civilization


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN101 PO - Introduction to Literary Analysis

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer; J. Abecassis
    Credit: 1

    Analysis of various literary genres and styles in poetry, prose and theatre. Close textual readings. Introduction to some critical methods and practice in the interpretation of texts. Written and oral work. Required of majors. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    FREN103 PO - Frenchness: May ‘68- 2018, and Beyond.

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    Frenchness: May ‘68- 2018 and Beyond. Social, cultural, political and literary determinants of the notion of “Frenchness.” From the famous “Events of May ‘68” through May 2018 and beyond, the evolution and transformation of ideas about what it means to be French. Stereotypes of French identity, analyzed and discussed through newspaper articles, excerpts from novels, interviews, songs and films. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive
  
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    FREN104 SC - History, Memory and Loss: Vichy


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN106 PO - French Creative Writing: Atelier d’écriture

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    Through a wide range of writing exercises in French, from prompt answers to translation work, this “atelier d’écriture” will help you gain familiarity with the conventions and techniques of literary genres, including fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama. You will engage in a creative process that incorporates research, revision, discussions with others and attention to form, audience, language and context. And in the end, you will be composing an original creative work in French. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: FREN 101 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN108 PO - Notre-Dame de Paris, “Point Zero”

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): V. Pouzet-Duzer
    Credit: 1

    Officially chosen as the point in Paris and in France, from which all distances are measured, Notre-Dame constitutes the country’s “Point Zero” How does it fulfill this function in ways not only geographical and symbolic but also cultural and historic? This course follows a transhistorical path, from the creation of the building in the twelfth century (April 1163) until the recent fire (April 15, 2019), and the beginning of the process of renovation. Why is this cathedral important for French identity? To answer this question, we will read and analyze historical texts, look at the literature (novels, opera, poems etc.) that take Notre-Dame as its main topic, and discuss paintings, sculpture, and architecture as well as photography.  Focusing on more recent and contemporary issues having to do with Notre-Dame (from its Napoleonic re-birth, to its Macronic re-construction), the course will also question the place of religions in France, as well as questions of politics and economics. Multimedia and trans-disciplinary, this course will ground you in centuries of French history and culture while giving you insights into France today. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive
  
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    FREN109 PO - Introduction to French Linguistics

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): D. Divita
    Credit: 1

    Examines the phonological, morphological and syntactic aspects of modern French to understand how it functions as a linguistic system. Includes a detailed unit on sociolinguistics, examining synchronic variation according to speaker (considering such variables as gender, age and class) and according to situations of use. Students will assemble a corpus of data collected from various media (audio, visual and textual) and use it to investigate a specific aspect of the structure of modern French. Course also serves practical needs of students pre-study abroad. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO  or FREN 101 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN110 PO - French Films

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    The aesthetics of a small selection of French films and the cultural, philosophical and political cultures out of which they were produced as an introduction to the major styles, periods, and directors of French cinema. Linguistic, technical and theoretical tools for cinematic analysis in French. Oral and written expression through discussion, essays and oral presentations. Possible filmmakers include Meliès, Renoir, Resnais, Rohmer, Truffaut, Godard, Kurys, Varda, Malle and Garrel. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN114 SC - Documenting the French


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN117 CM - Novel and Cinema in Africa and the Caribbean


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN120 CM - Order and Revolt in French Literature


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN121 SC - The Politics of Love


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN124 SC - The Novelist and Society in France


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN127 PO - Language and Power in the Francophone World

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): D. Divita
    Credit: 1

    An investigation of the complex relationship between language and identity in the French-speaking world. Who speaks French, how they speak it and why it matters. Increased oral and written proficiency and awareness of sociolinguistic issues through the analysis of primary documents regarding the history and politics of standardization; language policy in France and abroad and the meaning of regional and stylistic variation. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: FREN 101 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN129 PO - Who’s Afraid of Marcel Proust?

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    What does Marcel Proust’s monumental project teach us about French literature? How did his pastiches and references to the literary canon help Proust write? This course connects close readings of passages from “La Recherche” and their direct and indirect sources (Marie de France, Ronsard, Racine, Chateaubriand, Nerval, Sand, Bergson, etc.) as a way to review the spectrum of French literature. Prerequisites: FREN 101 PO  or the equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN132 CM - North African Lit after Independ


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN133 CM - Africa in France: The French of African Ancestry through Text and Film


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN150A PO - Les Moralistes: Public and Private Selves

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis
    Credit: 1

    Study of late 16th and 17th century French moral thought in the essays, plays, satire and dialogues of Montaigne, Molière, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld and Pascal. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN150B PO - Les Philosophes: Paradoxes of Nature

    When Offered: Spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis
    Credit: 1

    Enlightenment thought through the reading of tales, dialogues and essays of Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau and Sade. Prerequisite: FREN 101 PO  or FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN150C PO - Moralistes/Philosophes: Advanced Topics

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis
    Credit: 1

    In-depth study of a single author or theme in early French literature, e.g. Diderot’s fiction, The Confessions of Rousseau, the tragedies of Racine. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive; Writing Intensive
  
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    FREN151 PO - Men, Women and Power

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    The representation of power, gender and sexuality by female and male writers in 17th and 18th century France. How sexuality is used to maintain or subvert relationships between men and women. How texts implicate the reader in those struggles for power. Sensibility, pre-Romanticism and libertinism.  Molière, Prévost, and Laclos. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN152 PO - Literature as Resistance

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    How do literary works challenge so-called natural hierarchies such as class, race, and gender? Do they also reinforce them? Our corpus focuses on masters, servants and slaves in order to ask who is, and should be, on top. Famous plays by Moli?re and Beaumarchais expose the absurdity of traditional class and gender relations. Best-selling novels by Montesquieu and Mme de Graffigny about a Persian harem and a kidnapped Peruvian princess highlight despotism, xenophobia, and racism. Course concludes with your analysis of current representations of these issues. Reading, writing, and discussion in French.Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN173 PO - Reading Bodies

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    Gender and sexuality as a matter of nationality, race and class in nineteenth century French literature, art and popular culture. Marie Antoinette and patriotic masculinity, fashion plates and cross-dressers, manual laborers, dandies, prostitutes and sexual hermaphrodites among others. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN173 SC - Within the French Salon


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN174 PO - Adultery in the Novel.

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    Nineteenth-century French novels are obsessed with the appeal and fear of adultery and adulteration-the mixing of races, nations, bloodlines, classes, etc. Tempted by incest, adultery, miscegenation, and a romantic attraction to the Other (race, class, region, nation), nineteenth-century French protagonists are frequently condemned to live in exile or die of grief…. Why did the forbidden but desired Other play such a starring role in literature after the Revolution? And why does romance play such an important role in Romanticism, the first great literary movement of post-revolutionary French society? Novels by d’Albe, Staël, Duras and George Sand and a recent French film that reminds us that these questions are also our own. All readings, writings and discussion in French. Prerequisites: FREN 044 PO  or equivalent. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    FREN175 PO - Writing the Exotic

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): M. Waller
    Credit: 1

    Colonialism and the fascination with “exotic” lands and peoples in nineteenth century France. What do novels and other cultural texts tell us about nationalist fantasies and anxieties on the domestic front? A study of noble “savages,” savage slaves, racial ostracism, sex tourism and Orientalism in works by Chateaubriand, Duras, Hugo, Flaubert, Nerval and others. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    FREN178 PO - Writing the Painter, Painting the Writer

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    The relation between painting and literature, 1870-1939: What happens when writers and painters meet every day in cafés, fall in love with the same muses and share a similar passion for strolling through the crowd? Texts by Baudelaire, Flaubert, Zola, Mallarmé, Valéry and Proust; paintings by Courbet, Manet, Monet and Van Gogh. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN182 PO - Cannibalizing Surrealism

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    The evolution of the French surrealist movement from the dawn of World War I through the 1960s. How Surrealism continues to be embedded, cannibalized and commercialized today. Readings include manifestos, poems and novels. Aesthetic focus includes paintings, photographs and movies. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN185 PO - The Art of Modern Fiction

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): V. Duzer
    Credit: 1

    What happens when the almighty realist narrator disappears? What is new about “Le Nouveau Roman”? How can “the death of the author” keep the novel alive? Readings from 20th century and contemporary French and Francophone authors such as Proust, Sartre, Gide, Sarraute, Perec, Confiant, Modiano, Duras, Nothomb, Le Clézio. Prerequisite: FREN 044 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
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    FREN191 PO - Senior Thesis

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 0.5

    An independent research project culminating in a thesis at least 30 pages in length, written in French under the guidance of a department faculty member and read by one additional faculty reader. Year-long course, half-credit per semester; grade and credit awarded upon completion at the end of the second semester.
  
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    FREN192 PO - Senior Paper

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 0.5

    Independent research project culminating in a paper at least 12 to 15 pages in length, written in French under guidance of a department faculty member and read by one additional reader. Half-course.
  
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    FREN193 PO - Senior Oral Presentation

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 0

    For majors, in mid-April, a 15-20 minute public presentation in French on the topic of the senior thesis or paper. For minors, a 10 minute presentation at the same event. No credit. P/NC grading.
  
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    FREN199DRPO - French: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    FREN199IRPO - French: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): J. Abecassis; V. Duzer; M. Waller
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.

Gender and Women’s Studies

  
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    FGSS026 SC - Intro Fem+Gndr+Sexuality Studies


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    FGSS036 SC - Introduction to Queer Studies


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    FGSS183 SC - Feminist and Queer Science


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    FGSS188 SC - Advanced Topics in Queer Studies


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    FGSS188E SC - The Queer Transpacific: Sinophone Cultures and Race/Ethnicity in Asian America


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    FGSS192 SC - Antiracist Feminist Queer Praxis


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    GWS026 PO - Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): K. Tompkins; T. Ellison; A. Bahng; N. Duong
    Credit: 1

    Analyzes systemic and institutionalized forms of inequality and discrimination, production of sexual and gender difference historically and cross-culturally and articulations of gender with race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and colonialism. Embraces various feminist disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    GWS070 PO - Racial Capitalism and Abolition Democracy

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): T. Ellison
    This course offers students a rigorous introduction to racial capitalism, as a theory of change that is in dynamic tension with abolition and the struggle for an abolition democracy. Racial capitalism is a theoretical approach to understanding capitalist development that argues that capitalism is at the core a socialized mode of economic production. That means capitalism requires social relations and categories of difference to produce the value differences that result in profits. The racial in racial capitalism indexes how capitalism developed within the non-objective conditions of racial, ethnic, gendered, and sexed divisions that were crucial to the labor hierarchies of feudal Europe. This theory was innovated by Black Studies scholar Cedric Robinson thinking with W.E.B. Dubois, C.L.R. James and Frantz Fanon. ",,Area 3”
  
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    GWS140 PO - Queer of Color Critique: Literature and Theory

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): K. Tompkins; T. Ellison
    Credit: 1

    This class will examine the central texts of queer of color (Black, Latinx, Asian American and others) theory, while also studying the novels, poetry and plays of important authors. Emphasis on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Authors may include James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Larissa Lai, David Henry Hwang, Jessica Hagedorn, Jewelle Gomez, Beth Brant, Reinaldo Arenas and Jeanne Cordova. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: ENGL 067 PO  or GWS 026 PO  .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    GWS142 PO - Queering Childhood

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    This interdisciplinary course examines the figure of the Child and how this figuration is used by politics, law, and medicine to justify continued cultural investment in reproductive heteronormativity and productive ablebodiedness. In doing so, we examine the queer and crip children and childhoods against which the figure of the Child is articulated. This course draws on work in gender studies, childhood studies, disability studies, and queer theory, including Julian Gill-Peterson, Alison Kafer, Lee Edelman, and Katherine Boyd Stockton. Prerequisites: GWS 026 PO  or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive; Analyzing Difference
  
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    GWS162 PO - Decolonizing Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Bahng; N. Duong
    Credit: 1

    Through an analysis of historical and contemporary Asian American and Pacific Islander literature, film, performance, art, and popular culture, this course emphasizes a wide range of engagements with gender and sexuality that disrupts binary thinking on the topic. Students will examine the formation of Asian American genders and sexualities alongside histories of racialization, migration, and labor that span East, South, and Southeast Asian, as well as Pacific contexts. In our engagement with transpacific movements of people and culture, we will foreground settler colonial occupations of the Pacific Islands and highlight the work of decolonial queer-feminist thinkers like Haunani-Kay Trask, Maile Arvin, and Stephanie Nohelani Teves. We will attend to the incommensurability of migrant and indigenous frameworks, even as we move through the persistence and at times concurrence of multiple forms of colonialism that connect Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. Some questions we will address include: How do historical contexts (i.e. the Cold War, 9/11, Japanese internment) affect Asian American gender formations? What does the popular (Orientalist depictions of Asian women from Geisha Girl to Tiger Mom) have to do with the geo-political (U.S. economic relations with Asia)? How might an Asian American queer politics reveal the limitations of the model minority myth? How can centering Pacific Islander onto-epistemologies decolonize notions of gender and sexuality?
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference; Writing Intensive
  
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    GWS170 PO - Disability Studies: Foundations, Intersections, & Future

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): A. Bahng; N. Duong
    Credit: 1

    This course provides an overview of the growing field of disability studies. The first part of the course will focus on the field’s foundations, analyzing the investments in the notion of disability from a variety of fields, approaches and definitions, such as the law, medicine and the arts. In particular, the intersectional dimensions of disability will be stressed, as the category has played a key role in the production and organization of gender, race, sexuality, class and religion. The second part of the course will give an introduction to some of the major directions and shifts within the field, such as the transgendered body & medicalization, invisible disabilities, transnationalism, animal studies, new materialisms and technology/media. Prerequisites: GWS 026 PO  or FGSS 036 SC .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    GWS172 PO - Race, Gender, & The Environment

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Bahng; N. Duong
    Credit: 1

    This course takes an intersectional approach to environmental studies, emphasizing critical feminist, queer, trans, race, and disability studies. Highlighting decolonial and indigenous thought in particular, course assignments examine planetary futures that reflect on how histories of imperial conquest, settler colonialism, and global capitalism have contributed to anthropogenic climate change. Another goal of the class is to question how contemporary approaches to environmentalism might have arisen out of already limited epistemological frameworks and legal histories. As part of our investigation into the asymmetrical distribution of toxins and environmental fallout across different populations, students will not only grapple with biopolitical theory but also look to a range of cultural texts - from science fiction films to contemporary fiction to graphic art - to consider alternative political assemblages and strategies for survival that arise from gender and ethnic studies frameworks. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: GWS 026 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    GWS180 PO - Queer and Feminist Theories

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    This class provides an overview of recent critical work in the field of feminist and queer theory. It is a necessary course for both the GWS major and minor. Emphasis on intersections with critical race and transnational theory; materials will be drawn from a broad range of disciplines including anthropology, history, political philosophy, literature and others. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: GWS 026 PO . May be repeated twice for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    GWS182 PO - Feminist and Queer Materialisms: Ecologies of Affect, Feeling and Sensation

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): A. Bahng; K. Tompkins
    Credit: 1

    This course will take up recent developments in political and cultural theory that engage the changing planetary and political landscape via an inquiry into the materiality of the world. We will read recent work in affect theory, object-oriented ontology and inquire into the conversation between old materialism (Marxism and class analysis) and new materialism (an interest that the physical life of the world has vital consequences for its human and animal inhabitants). Prerequisites: One other course in queer, feminist or media theory. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    GWS183 PO - Transnational Feminist Theories

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Globalization has had multifarious cultural, economic and political effects on conceptualizations of “sexuality” and its relationship to gender across the world. In this class, we will learn how to situate cultural, and historical understandings of gender and sexuality in their geopolitical specificity. We will examine concepts of identity, sexual practices and queerness in relation to notions of the local-global, nationhood, the transnational, diaspora, borders, margins, and urban-rural. We will bring postcolonial, transnational, queer, and feminist disciplinary approaches to bear upon one another, in order to study how knowledge about sex, gender and sexuality is produced and disseminated transnationally.

    Prerequisite: GWS 026 PO .


    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3

  
  •  

    GWS185 PO - Biopolitics: Sex, Capitalism, Affect

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): K. Tompkins
    Credit: 1

    This course will center on the writings of Michel Foucault as well as his interlocutors and successors to ask about the workings of power, discipline and control in the modern era. Emphasis on queer, feminist and critical race implications of these theories, however a majority of the class will take up the writings and lectures of Foucault. GWS 026 PO  and/or GWS 180 PO  strongly recommended as prerequisites, or other critical and political theory classes.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    GWS186 PO - Theories of the Body

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    The body has been theorized, understood and controlled in a variety of ways by artists, theorists, politicians, governments and churches, amongst many others. This course will examine the multiple modes by which the body has been understood and imagined, drawing primarily from queer, feminist, disability and critical race scholars. In addition, we will explore the political implications of how the body is theorized. Rather than perpetuating a universalist understanding of the body as ahistorical or demanding an over-determined particularity around the body that neglects forms of relationality, we will seek to balance questions of bodily matter and experience with gestures towards relations to another. We will read scholars such as Hortense Spillers, Saba Mahmood, Michel Foucault, Susan Stryker, Anne Fausto-Sterling, Jean-Luc Nancy, Mel Chen, Bryan Turner and Gilles Deleuze. Prerequisites: GWS 026 PO  or FGSS 036 SC  and one upper-division course in GWS.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
  •  

    GWS189B PO - LGBTQ Social Movements in the US

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    This interdisciplinary course will examine the development of LGBTQ social movements in the US by linking the context, goals, and outcomes of movements to the dynamics of race, class, gender, sexuality, age, ability, immigration status, and geography. Our goal will be to understand the ways that LGBTQ social movements impact and are impacted by cultural and governmental institutions, and how these relationships have determined contemporary queer life, politics and thought. We will also examine several ongoing issues that have inspired LGBTQ organizing. We will incorporate non-academic critical sources, video clips, films, guest speakers, community events into our learning environment in order to explore the multiple facets of LGBTQ political work. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
  •  

    GWS190 PO - Senior Seminar

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Z. Kassam
    Credit: 1

    An overview and integration of work in gender and women’s studies through readings, student-led discussion and analysis of interdisciplinary issues. Guidance on research and writing the thesis. Throughout the semester, students also meet with the advisor in their discipline and/or department. Students turn in one thesis chapter at the end of the semester. Senior majors only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Analyzing Difference; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    GWS191 PO - Senior Thesis

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Senior Thesis
  
  •  

    GWS199DRPO - Gender/Women’s Studies: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
  •  

    GWS199IRPO - Gender/Women’s Studies: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
  •  

    GWS199RAPO - Gender/Women’s Studies: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

Geography

  
  
  
  

Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL015 PO - Living on the Edge: Earthquakes and Water in Southern California

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): L. Reinen
    Credit: 1

    Shifting plates and shifting climate, especially with regards to water, are integral parts of the Southern California setting. In this introductory level course, students explore the tectonic and hydrologic challenges unique to Southern Californians–where we are now and what might the future hold? Lectures, hands-on exercises, exams, field trip. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL020A PO - Intro to Geology: Geohazards

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): N. Moore; L. Reinen
    Credit: 1

    Environmental response to natural and anthropogenic forces may result in various geologic hazards, including earthquakes, volcanic activity, landslides, coastal erosion, floods and groundwater pollution. This course includes an introduction to basic geological concepts, with a focus on current hazardous regions, historical events, impact on humans and forecasting abilities. Field trips.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL020B PO - Intro to Geology: Planetary Geology

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): E. Grosfils
    Credit: 1

    Comparative study of Mars and Earth provides exciting opportunities to gain insight into physical geological processes. In this class, we explore how the operation of a similar array of geological processes (e.g., impact cratering, volcanic, tectonic, hydrological) can yield such strikingly beautiful yet mutually alien surfaces over the course of solar system history. Field trips.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL020C PO - Intro to Geology: Environmental Geology

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): JS. Lackey
    Credit: 1

    Investigates the complex interactions between humans and their geologic environment, including an introduction to essential geologic concepts, as well as studies of geologic resources, geologic hazards and the impact that humans have on geologic systems. Field trips.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL020E PO - Oceanography

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Prokopenko
    Credit: 1

    Investigation of geological, physical, chemical and biological processes operating in the oceans. Topics include marine geology, plate tectonics, seawater chemistry, tides, currents, coastal processes, marine life and human interactions with the oceans. Field trips.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL020G PO - Climate Change

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    An integrated perspective of Earth’s dynamic climate through time. Students will explore the linkages of physical, chemical, biological and geological factors which regulate the Earth’s intricate climate system. Special emphasis to be placed on the geologic record of Earth’s climate and evaluation of anthropogenic influences on climate. 
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL112 PO - Remote Sensing of Earth’s Environment

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): E. Grosfils
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to the collection, manipulation and interpretation of data collected by Earth-observing satellites. An understanding of basic physical principles, integrated with extensive hands-on work emphasizing digital analysis techniques, paves the way for a project in which students explore a complex environmental question. Prerequisites: Area 4 course or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    GEOL120 PO - Introduction to Geochemistry

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): JS. Lackey
    Credit: 1

    The course provides an introduction to routine methods of geochemical analysis of a variety of geological and related materials and the theory behind these techniques as well as methods for evaluation of analytical outcomes. Students will be trained in x-ray diffraction and fluorescence, electron microscopy, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Analyses of rocks, crystals, fossils, soils, waters, plant materials and other organic matter will be used to frame how these techniques can be used to execute research in the Earth Sciences. Prerequisites: One introductory geology course.

    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL121 PO - Tectonic Landscapes

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): L. Reinen
    Credit: 1

    Integrating field and GIS mapping, quantitative geomorphic analyses, and numerical modeling, students investigate crustal deformation at local and regional scales and geomorphic expressions of tectonically derived features. Lectures, projects, field trip. Prerequisites: One introductory geology course. Previously offered as GEOL175  PO.
     
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL125 PO - Earth History with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Earth system evolution through geologic time. Earth’s dynamic history is explored through examination of key intervals of change. Topics include origin of Earth, development of continents, origin and evolution of life, Earth crises and mass extinctions and climate change. Lab component emphasizes interpretation of geologic history from the rock record. Field trips. Prerequisite: One introductory geology course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL127 PO - Mineralogy with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): N. Moore
    Credit: 1

    Minerals are the building blocks of the solid Earth. The interrelation of chemical, structural and optical properties is emphasized for identifying minerals in the field and lab and understanding their geologic significance. The course makes use of optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and computer visualization techniques. Field trips. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: One introductory geology course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL129 PO - Geophysics with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): E. Grosfils
    Credit: 1

    Introduction to geophysical techniques and their application to geological investigation of the subsurface at a variety of scales. Computer applications, hands-on field training and lectures provide insight into the principles of seismic, gravity, magnetic and other key geophysical methods. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: MATH 030 PO  and one introductory geology course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    GEOL130 PO - Carbonates through Geologic Time

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): R. Gaines
    Credit: 1

    Limestones and related carbonate rocks lie at the intersection of tectonic processes, the climate system, and the biosphere. They play a critical role in Earth’s carbon cycle, in climate changes over long timescales, and in the history of life on Earth. This course will investigate the Earth systems processes that lead to the origin of carbonate sediments and explore the environments of their deposition. In addition, significant emphasis will be given to the geologic record of carbonates and their role in Earth systems evolution. Students will engage in hands-on lab inquiry, lead seminar-style discussions, and participate in field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 015 PO  or any version of a GEOL020 PO course. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL131 PO - Physical Volcanology with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): E. Grosfils
    Credit: 1

    A quantitatively grounded introduction to basic elements of physical volcanology, with emphasis upon understanding the mechanics of intrusive, effusive and explosive volcanic processes, their link to landform morphology and associated geohazards. Includes field trip(s) and lab section. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: MATH 030 PO  and one introductory geology course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL181 PO - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): JS. Lackey
    Credit: 1

    Igneous and metamorphic rocks and the processes by which they originate, are evaluated from thermodynamic, geochemical and petrographic perspectives. Topics include magma formation, diversification and crystallization, pressure-temperature-fluid histories of metamorphic rocks and petrofabric analysis. Emphasis is placed on how to recognize petrologic associations and relate them to tectonic setting. Includes field trips and lab section. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: GEOL 127 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL183 PO - Sedimentology with Laboratory

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Origin and interpretation of sedimentary rocks with focus on interpretation of ancient depositional environments, sedimentary petrology and actualistic study. A major independent research project, conducted throughout the semester, is included. Field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 125 PO  and GEOL 127 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL185 PO - Structural Geology

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): L. Reinen
    Credit: 1

    A study of the formation of rock structures from microscopic to continental scale. Topics include stress, strain, deformation mechanisms and the large-scale forces responsible for crustal deformation. Field trip. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: One course from GEOL 121 PO  , GEOL 125 PO , GEOL 127 PO , GEOL 129 PO , and GEOL 131 PO . Corequisites: A second course from GEOL 121 PO  , GEOL 125 PO , GEOL 127 PO , GEOL 129 PO , and GEOL 131 PO .
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL189A PO - Geoarchaeology; Stone Age through Bronze Age

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): W. McLaughlin
    Credit: 1

    Geology provides an excellent tool to examine how landscapes, climates, and the organisms inhabiting them drove the rise (and fall) of civilizations. In this course we will concentrate on the Stone Age through the Bronze Age, looking at how we became a species, how our species spread across the globe, and how events like the domestication of plants and animals to climate change shaped ancient people’s lives. How can geology help us to trace the invention of tools, the development of complex trade routes, and even the invention of art? How did interactions with prehistoric beasts shape our world, inform our legends, and lead to the domestic plants and animals of today? And finally how have changing climates left their mark on both the rock record and archaeological record, driving the ascension and collapse of civilizations? Letter grade only. Prerequisites: GEOL 015 PO, or any version of a GEOL020 course, or EA 055L KS or EA 100L KS or permission of instructor.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL189C PO - Oceans on a Habitable Planet: Past and Present

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): M. Prokopenko
    Credit: 1

    This course covers basic principles of physical, chemical and biological oceanography, with elements of paleoceanography and climate studies. Topics include: origins of oceans, origin of life, ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling, global change on various timescales and chemical/isotopic traces of past ocean/climate history. Emphasis on specific topics is subject to change from year to year depending on student interests. A quantitative component introduces students to simple geochemical modeling (e.g. box models of element cycling). A blend of lectures, student-led seminar discussions, and hands-on modeling exercises will make up class meetings; course project work will make use of the Geology department geochemical and/or computational research facilities. Prerequisites: either GEOL 015 PO  or any version of a GEOL020  PO course or an introductory level chemistry course. The course is offered as an intermediate level elective. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL189D PO - Meteorites and Solar System Evolution

    When Offered: One-time only; spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): N. Moore
    Credit: 0.5

    A seminar style course that examines the origin and formation of meteorites and the clues they provide regarding the birth and evolution of our solar system and terrestrial planetary bodies. Learning will be achieved by a combination of lectures, hands-on lab activities looking at the textures and composition of meteorites, and student-led in class discussions based on readings of relevant peer-reviewed papers. Topics will include meteorite classification, the asteroid-meteorite connection, early solar system formation, the differentiation of meteorites and planetary bodies, and impacts to planetary bodies including Earth, Mars and the Moon. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: GEOL 015 PO , or any version of a GEOL020 course, or permission of instructor.
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
  
  •  

    GEOL189G PO - Introduction to GIS for Geologists

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): E. Grosfils
    GIS (Geographic Information System) is an analytical computational tool widely used within the social and natural sciences that enhances our ability to investigate geospatial and geotemporal problems at a wide variety of scales. In this class you will [1] obtain an introduction to the fundamentals of GIS analysis and [2] gain experience integrating these skills and using them to explore an array of geologically-relevant questions. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: Any introductory geology course (GEOL 015 PO, or any version of a GEOL020 course, or EA 055L KS or EA 100L KS) or permission of instructor. Course is equivalent to EA 010 PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4
  
  •  

    GEOL189J PO - Communicating Geology

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Lackey
    Credit: 1

    This course is planned as an introspective examination of how Geologist help people can understand Earth’s hazards; distribution of resources; and its sensitivity to their actions (e.g. burning fossil fuels). The class will analyze portrayals and stories of geologists in various media (popular books, movies, essays, cartoons, blogs) to evaluate best ways to communicate geology to others. Prerequisites: one GEOL020x course. Co-requisites: any GEOL course above GEOL020x.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 4; Speaking Intensive
  
  •  

    GEOL192 PO - Senior Project in Geology

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Field-, laboratory- or library-based geological research to address an original question undertaken by arrangement with a faculty supervisor during the senior year. Students conducting field or laboratory research generally start their work in the summer prior to their senior year. Half-course each semester. Grade and credit awarded at the end of the second semester. (Students may complete the thesis in one semester by permission.) Letter grade only.
  
  •  

    GEOL199DRPO - Geology: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
  •  

    GEOL199IRPO - Geology: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.

German

  
  •  

    GERM001 PO - Elementary German 1

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): M. Katz; H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 1

    Acquisition of basic oral communication, survey of German grammar, practice in reading and writing. Meets four days a week with instructor. Fifth hour with native speaker.
  
  •  

    GERM002 PO - Elementary German 2

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): M. Katz; staff
    Credit: 1

    Acquisition of basic oral communication, survey of German grammar, practice in reading and writing. Meets four days a week with instructor. Fifth hour with native speaker. Prerequisite: GERM 001 PO  or Scripps equivalent.
  
  •  

    GERM010 PO - Intensive Introduction to German Language and Culture

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High
    Credit: 1

    GERM 010 offers an intensive introduction to spoken German, to listening comprehension and to German literature, culture and society. For an additional half credit students may participate in an intensive grammar lab (GRMT 014 PO ). Depending on the individual level of enrollment and participation; the course prepares students for a variety of follow-up courses (GERM 011 PO , GERM 002 PO , GERM 013 PO ) as well as for internship and study programs in Germany that are conducted primarily in English. Meets four hours a week with instructor. Fifth hour with native speaker.
  
  •  

    GERM011 PO - German Conversation, Intermediate

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Dwyer
    Credit: 0.25

    Open to all students except native speakers. Credit for satisfactory participation in Oldenborg Center activities and two conversation classes weekly. Prerequisite: one year of college-level language study or equivalent. Cumulative, one-quarter course credit; graded P/NC. Does not satisfy the foreign language requirement. Limited to one enrollment per semester and a cumulative total of one course credit. Prerequisite: GERM 002 PO  or equivalent. 
  
  •  

    GERM013 PO - German Conversation, Advanced

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Dwyer
    Credit: 0.25

    Open to all students except native speakers. Credit for satisfactory participation in Oldenborg Center activities and two conversation classes weekly. Prerequisite: two years of college-level language study or equivalent. Cumulative, one-quarter course credit; graded P/NC. Does not satisfy the foreign- language requirement. Limited to one enrollment per semester and a cumulative total of one course credit. Prerequisite: GERM 044 PO  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    GERM033 PO - Intermediate German

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High; K. Vennemann
    Credit: 1

    Emphasis on developing reading ability. Extensive review of grammar; continuing acquisition of new vocabulary and conversational skills. Meets three days a week. Fourth hour with native speaker once a week. Prerequisite: GERM 002 PO  or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GERM044 PO - Advanced German

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): M. Katz
    Credit: 1

    Emphasis on correct, idiomatic writing. Essays every other week, oral work and grammar review. Meets two days a week. Small conversation groups with native speaker once a week. Prerequisite: GERM 033 PO  or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GERM101 PO - Introduction to German Culture

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High; K. Vennemann
    Credit: 1

    This course will introduce students to some of the most compelling issues and debates in German culture through fiction, criticism and philosophy, as well as film, the visual arts and music. The presentation of materials is exemplary rather than comprehensive and is based on thematic, historical, generic and other units. Prerequisite: GERM 044 PO  or Scripps equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive
  
  •  

    GERM102 PO - Intro to German Literature

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    In tracing the figure of the artist from Romanticism to the Postmodern, attention will be given to the ideal of creative genius, in both its heroic and decadent modes or forms. Readings will include theoretical texts, reflections on art and the self and literary texts. Prerequisite: GERM 044 PO  or Scripps equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GERM103 PO - Intro to German Media and Film

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 1

    Introduces students to some of the most compelling issues and debates in German culture through various forms of media, including films and television, music, advertising and the visual arts. The presentation of materials is exemplary rather than comprehensive; based on thematic, historical, generic and other units. Prerequisite: GERM 044 PO  or Scripps equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
  
  •  

    GERM104 PO - Composition and Creative Writing

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High
    Credit: 1

    This course provides students with intensive practice in academic as well as critical creative writing, introducing them to German stylistics, the varieties of essay construction, and general principles of short scholarly and fiction writing.  Students analyze, discuss, write about, and produce a range of short scholarly and literary texts, thereby enhancing their writing skills as well as their reading abilities and familiarity with scholarly and creative writing conventions. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO   or equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 6; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    GERM105 SC - Berlin Stories


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement
 

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