2020-21 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    Aug 14, 2022  
2020-21 Pomona College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG] Use the dropdown above to select the current 2020-21 catalog.

Courses


Check major and minor requirement sections in the Departments, Programs and Areas of Study section to determine if specific courses will satisfy requirements. Inclusion on this list does not imply that the course will necessarily satisfy a requirement.

Click here  to view a Key to Course Listings and Discipline codes.

 

German

  
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    GERM151 PO - Language at its Limits: German Poetry in Cultural Context

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher; F. v. Schwerin-High
    Credit: 1

    Radically critiquing historical developments and envisioning alternatives, German lyric poetry has used formal and semantic experimentation to explore the limits of truth, beauty, meaning and the human experience. This course offers a survey of representative German lyric poetry with a particular emphasis on poetological innovations and their historical contexts in the twentieth century. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO  or Scripps equivalent.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive
  
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    GERM152H PO - Drama as Experiment

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High
    Credit: 0.5

    German dramatists from the Enlightenment to the 20th-century struggled to create possibilities for human dignity in a hostile universe. Beginning with Naturalism, they also delved into new topics: class struggle, sexuality and the problematic nature of human communication. In the process, traditional forms were undermined and the very notions of character, plot and dramatic performance were questioned. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO . Previously offered as GERM152  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement; Speaking Intensive
  
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    GERM154F PO - Contemporary German Fiction

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 1

    Germany is the world’s most popular country (BBC), the German government is holding up the West singlehandedly (various sources) - and German literary authors are doing just fine, thank you (Frankfurter Buchmesse). The only sad thing: they rarely get translated into English - you have to read them in German. This course introduces students to some of the best contemporary German prose fiction and contextualizes it. Close reading and interpretation; some secondary literature and criticism; discussion; written and oral student contributions. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO  or equivalent. Previously offered as GERM154  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    GERM154H PO - Contemporary German Fiction

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Germany is the world’s most popular country (BBC), the German government is holding up the West singlehandedly (various sources) – and German literary authors are doing just fine, thank you (Frankfurter Buchmesse). The only sad thing: they rarely get translated into English – you have to read them in German. This course introduces students to some of the best contemporary German prose fiction and contextualizes it. Close reading and interpretation; some secondary literature and criticism; discussion; written and oral student contributions. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO  or equivalent. Previously offered as GERM154  PO. Course must be taken twice to fulfill the foreign language requirement.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement; Writing Intensive
  
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    GERM164H PO - Vom Beruf zum Gig: Arbeitswelt im Wandel

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 0.5

    This is a half-credit German-language section that accompanies GRMT-164 for those students who have advanced German language capabilities (German-44 or higher) and want to cover the topic of GRMT-164 through analogous materials in German. The focus will be on shorter texts and the German imaginary of work, from the soldier to the craftsman, the merchant, the bureaucrat and on to the modern gig worker. May also be taken without being enrolled in GRMT-164. Discussion in German. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO  or equivalent. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GERM180 PO - Deutschland in Schwarz und Weiss: Rassismus, Xenophobie, und deutsche Geschichte/Germany Black and White: Race, Xenophobia, and Germany History

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Based on a blend of texts, this cultural-studies course provides a survey of the current state of race relations and racial discourse in the German-speaking countries. It draws on input from literary sources, discussions in media, presentations in film and other visuals, and experiences in daily life. The course will also facilitate conversations on (colonial) history, comparison of racial issues and racism between the Germanic countries and the USA, and provide broader context for aspects of (labor) migration, refugee policies, and the persistence of xenophobia and right-wing ideologies. The course will also present national and transnational efforts (for instance via the EU) to address the social ills of racism and discrimination. Prerequisites: GERM044 PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GERM189 PO - German Language Component

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Integrates a German language component into German program courses taught in English. May also be taken without being enrolled in the main course. Prerequisites: GERM 044 PO  or permission of the German instructor. Half-course credit. May be repeated for credit. Course must be taken twice to fulfill the foreign language requirement.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Language Requirement
  
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    GERM191 PO - Senior Thesis in German

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Prerequisite: permission of the student’s advisor and the coordinator. Course or half-course.
  
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    GERM193 PO - German Comprehensive Exams

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Preparation for six-hour written and one-hour oral examinations for the major, testing the student’s general competence in the discipline. Half-course. Graded P/NC.
  
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    GERM199DRPO - German: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    GERM199IRPO - German: Independent Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    GERM199RAPO - German: Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

German Literature in Translation

  
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    GRMT014 PO - Adventures in German Syntax for Reading and Translation

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High
    Credit: 0.5

    Starting with simplified newspaper texts but building up to texts of increasing sophistication and specialization, this course introduces students to German syntax and grammar in context. Recognizing syntactical markers, students learn how to make sense of a variety of German texts with just the help of a dictionary. No prior knowledge of German required but appropriate for all levels of German proficiency. Taught in English.
  
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    GRMT114 SC - Plotting Crime


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GRMT116 SC - The Decadents


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GRMT130 SC - Schools of Cultural Criticism


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GRMT131 PO - Germany Today

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): F. von Schwerin-High
    Credit: 1

    Explores current and emerging topics regarding Germany in the European and transatlantic context. Topics range from media and communication to literature, commemoration and education to ecology and current events. Course provides an up-to-date and comprehensive yet focused inquiry into specific developments relevant for contemporary society. May be repeated once for credit.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
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    GRMT162 PO - Rich, Pretty, Orderly - Swiss?

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 1

    What Makes Switzerland Tick. The doughnut hole of Europe - in the middle but largely unfamiliar. This cultural studies course fills the knowledge gap about Switzerland through a comprehensive account of the country’s role in the European and global cultural and political frameworks via (literary) texts, films, historical and economic sources and in-depth analysis of this successful multicultural country’s political system, its neutrality and significant international presence. (German in Translation)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Writing Intensive
  
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    GRMT164 PO - Profession? Job? Gig?: Changing Worlds of Work

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 1

    Based on a blend of texts from history, the social sciences, literature, and the arts, this cultural-studies course provides students with a survey of how humans have depicted, thought of, and written about work. Why do we work? How do we work? Where and when do we work? Who works? and who has leisure? The course privileges somewhat European and German ideas (Marx, Weber, socialist class and gender concepts of work) but is open to broader comparative and global contributions. It addresses issues of labor, the large-scale social and economic organization of work for an industry or a nation, as well as the psychological, emotional, individual dimension of identity, self-worth, and one’s social standing.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GRMT170 PO - Culture of Nature: Green Movements

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 1

    This concept-and theory-focused course analyzes forms of discourses on nature and the environment in their historical emergence, development, and contemporary usages. It investigates representations of nature, from anonymous observations to the rise of scientific and scholarly debate, followed by political and commercial utilization. It unfolds broader frameworks of how culture has always shaped scientific and environmental debates, supported political views, and provided social values. The course is comparative and links European and American cultural-historical contexts. Specific recent topics include emergence of Green thinking, anti-nuclear and peace movements, advertisement and environmental esthetics, degrowth, climate change, and others.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1; Speaking Intensive
  
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    GRMT180H PO - Germany Black and White: Race, Xenophobia, and Germany History

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    This is a half-credit English-language version of the German-language GERM180 PO offered for all students who do not have advanced German language capabilities (German-44 or higher to enroll in the full credit GERM180 PO) but are interested in the thematics. Based on a blend of sources, this cultural-studies course provides a survey of the current state of race relations and racial discourse in the German-speaking countries. It draws on input from literary texts, discussions in media, presentations in film and other visuals, and experiences in daily life. A key goal of the course is, beyond the broad content focus on questions of race, migration, xenophobia, class, and DEI, to offer an alternative view of these topics beyond the US-American debate. Many students are doubtlessly already acquainted with the latter, and the course provides a new lens on these questions through the cultural historical parameters of a different country/culture. Lastly, the course also presents national and transnational efforts (for instance via the EU) to address the social ills of racism and discrimination.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 1
  
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    GRMT189 PO - English Language Component

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): H. Rindisbacher
    Credit: 0.5

    GRMT189 PO integrates an English language lecture and discussion component into select upper-division German program courses taught in German. May also be taken without being enrolled in the main course.
  
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    GRMT199DRPO - German St: Directed Readings

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Directed Readings. Syllabus reflects workload of a standard course in the department or program. Examinations or papers equivalent to a standard course. Regular interaction with the faculty supervisor. Weekly meetings are the norm. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    GRMT199IRPO - German St: Indep Research

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5-1

    Independent Research or Creative Project. A substantial and significant piece of original research or creative product produced. Pre-requisite course work required. Available for full- or half-course credit.
  
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    GRMT199RAPO - German St:Research Assistantship

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): Staff
    Credit: 0.5

    Research Assistantship. Lab notebook, research summary or other product appropriate to the discipline is required. Half-course credit only.

History

  
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    HIST008 PO - Heroes and Heroines in the Ancient Mediterranean

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2019.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    From the blood-drenched battlefields of Troy to the rhetorical schools of imperial Rome, from Gilgamesh’s early quest for immortality to Perpetua’s willing embrace of martyrdom, famous stories of heroic individuals not merely edified and entertained audiences across the ancient Mediterranean but fundamentally shaped their own values and experiences. In this course we will explore how common narratives of heroism and of the well-lived life shaped the political and cultural histories of the Mediterranean world from 3000 B.C.E. to 400 C.E., from the rise of the earliest Ancient Near Eastern empires through the decline of the Roman Empire. There will be a strong emphasis on engaging with the ancient sources in translation, with readings drawn especially from the genres of epic (Homer’s Iliad, Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Works & Days), historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus), and biography (Law Code of Hammurabi, Xenophon’s Agesilaus, Plutarch’s Lives, and the Passion of Perpetua).
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST010 PO - Ancient Mediterranean

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    This course surveys the political and cultural histories of the Mediterranean world from 3000 B.C.E. to 400 C.E., from the rise of the earliest Ancient Near Eastern empires through the decline of the Roman Empire. There will be a strong emphasis on critical engagement with ancient sources in translation, from the Epic of Gilgamesh and Code of Hammurabi through Homer’s Iliad, the Histories of Herodotus and Thucydides, and Augustus’ Res Gestae. Special attention will be paid to ancient imperialism, the development of Greco-Roman historiography and the many enduring legacies of these ancient Mediterranean cultures. (Core course, Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST011 PO - Medieval Mediterranean

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): K. Wolf
    Credit: 1

    This course offers a broad history of the greater Mediterranean world from the first to the fourteenth centuries with particular attention to 1) the competition between its Greek, Latin, and Arabic sectors for hegemony in the region, and 2) the interplay between the Abrahamic and Socratic legacies that shaped the writings of the Jews, Christians, and Muslims who inhabited the region. The primary sources that make up the readings for this course have been selected with these two overarching themes in mind. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST012 PO - Saints and Society

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): K. Wolf
    Credit: 1

    A history of Christian sanctity from the first to the thirteenth centuries, predicated on the notion that you can tell a lot about a past culture by the way it conceived of its heroes. The bulk of the readings are saints’ lives written by Christian hagiographers whose collective task it was to construct a timeless sense of Christian perfection out of a seemingly infinite variety of individual cases. Learning how to read these curious texts for the information they contain about the late antique/medieval mind-set is the principal challenge of the course. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST014 PO - Medieval Europe and the World Outside

    When Offered: Fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): K.Wolf
    Credit: 1

    The crusades and the Spanish reconquista opened the door to a deeper Medieval European experience of Asia and Africa and laid the groundwork for the European expansion of the Americas. This course will focus on firsthand accounts of those medieval European soldiers, sailors, chaplains, missionaries and merchants who found themselves in such uncharted territory. We will use these primary sources to reconstruct medieval European perceptions of non-Europeans in an effort to appreciate the formative role that such “imagining” of the other played in the construction of European identity. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST016 PZ - Environmental History


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST017 CH - Introduction to Chicanx Latinx History

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): T. Summers Sandoval
    Credit: 1

    An introductory survey to the historical experiences of Chicanx/Latinx peoples in the United States, including Mexican and Puerto Rican diasporas, as well as South and Central American migrations.  Exposes students to historical methods and analysis through topics like migration and settlement; community and identity formation; and the roles of races, gender, class and sexuality in social and political histories. Culminates in a public research project. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    HIST020 PO - The United States from the Colonial Era to the Gilded Age

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2016.
    Instructor(s): H. Wall
    Credit: 1

    Development of the United States from colonial times to the late 19th century, emphasizing the social, political and socioeconomic conflicts that shaped its development. (Core course, United States)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST020 PZ - Greece and Rome


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST021 PO - Dynamics of Power in the US

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): V. Silverman
    Credit: 1

    US history in the last 150 years has revolved around battles over equity in the economy, the control of government, the fighting of wars and the possibilities for social justice. This course introduces students to the study of these conflicts through an examination of power in politics, society and the economy. Students will learn key historical methods as they consider four crucial periods: The disappointing aftermath of the Civil War, the fight over corporate industrial capitalism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the triumph of the statist New Deal order in the 1930s and the return of inequality in the neoliberalism of recent decades. Because historical questions are informed by contemporary issues and debates, the class will also address current events that emerge from the way Americans settled these older conflicts. (Core Course: United States)
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    HIST024 PO - Race and American Religion in Global Perspective

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): S. Reidy
    Credit: 1

    In this course we will examine the connections between religion in America and transnational diasporas, empires, and missionary networks. We will learn how faith communities construct racial identity, and how spirituality can be used to harden or challenge racial hierarchies. This course examines six religious traditions, three that began overseas and spread to North America, and three that began in the United States and then spread globally. We begin by considering how Spanish Catholicism, English Puritanism, and contemporary Islam encountered the American context, and then analyze the American roots and transnational spread of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Mormonism, and Pentecostalism. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST025 CH - All Power to the People! Social Movements for Justice

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): T. Summers Sandoval
    Credit: 1

    All Power to the People! Social Movements for Justice. A survey of 20th-century movements for change, with a focus on those created by and for communities of color. Examines issues of race, gender and class in U.S. society while investigating modern debates surrounding equity, equality and social justice. Letter grade only. (United States)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
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    HIST025 PZ - U.S. History before 1877


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST031 CH - Colonial Latin America

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): A. Mayes
    Credit: 1

    Examines the rise of the Aztec and Incan empires; the Spanish conquest and settlement of the Americas; the evolution and consolidation of colonial institutions; the significance of race, gender and sexuality in shaping the culture of the colonial society from the perspectives of Indigenous, European and African peoples; and the settlement of Brazil and the impact of the Age of Revolution, especially the Haitian Revolution, on the process of independence. (Core course, Latin America and the Caribbean)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST032 CH - Latin America Since Independence

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): M. Tinker Salas
    Credit: 1

    The history of Latin America from 1820s to the present, including the complex process of national consolidation, the character of new societies, the integration of Latin American nations into the world market, the dilemma of mono-export economies, political alternatives to the traditional order and relations with the United States. (Core course, Latin America and the Caribbean)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST034 CH - History of Mexico

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): M.Tinker Salas
    Credit: 1

    The course traces Mexican history from pre-Columbian times to the present. It explores the character of Indigenous societies, the nature of the encounter, the colonial legacy, the tumultuous nineteenth century, the Mexican Revolution, United States-Mexican relations, politics during the 20th century, immigration, the rise of social movements and the current drug war.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST035 PZ - Hist of Middle East, 600-1500 AD


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST036 PO - Women of Honor, Women of Shame: Women’s Lives in Latin America and the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1300-1900

    When Offered: Spring 2022.
    Instructor(s): A. Mayes
    Credit: 1

    Overview of the life chances, economic opportunities and social expectations for women of European, Indigenous and African descent during and after colonial rule in Latin America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean. (Latin America and the Caribbean)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST036 PZ - History of Modern Middle East


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST040 AF - History of Africa to 1800

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): M.O. Traoré
    Credit: 1

    History of Africa from the earliest times to the beginning of the 19th century. Attention given to the methodology and theoretical framework used by the Africanist, the development of early African civilizations and current debates and trends in the historiography of Africa. (Core course, Africa, African Diaspora and Middle East)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST041 AF - Africa in World Politics, 1884 to 2000.

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): O. Traore.
    Credit: 1

    Attention given to developing a broad understanding of the political, economic, and social changes in Africa after the arrival of Europeans on the continent. The course analyzes the long-lasting socio-political impacts of the Berlin Conference in present-day Africa in terms of governance and ethnic conflicts. We will also bring into sharper focus the Cold War, the rise of strongmen, development issues, new forms of civil society, and democratization processes in Africa. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST042 PO - Worlds of Islam

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2015.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    A global history of Islamic societies since the fourteenth century, examining the period when Islam became a world religion. Approaches the integrated histories of the Asian, African and Indian Ocean worlds. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST043 PO - The Middle East in Modern Times

    When Offered: Spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    Survey of the social, political and cultural history of the Middle East and North Africa since 1500, examining the transition from the age of empires to the emergence of nation-building projects in the region. Subjects include state and society under early modern Islamic empires; Western colonialism and imperialism; the integration of the region into the world economy; and the emergence of the nation-state system in the Middle East and North Africa. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST047 PO - Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2018.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    The history of the interregional Islamic “gunpowder empires” of the early modern period: the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals. Examines the ways in which Muslim empires ruled heterogeneous populations and expansive frontiers and became involved in global patterns of trade and cross-cultural exchange between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST110AKPO. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST048 SC - Gndr/Tstmny in LatAm & Caribbean


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
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    HIST049 PO - Iran and the World

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    An exploration of the history of Iran and its global interactions from the times of the Persian empires and the Silk Roads to the age of empires and the coming of the 1979 Revolution. The course considers the land, language and literature of the peoples of Iran, tracing the adoption of Islam, the establishment of early modern Persianate empires, encounters with European imperialism, integration into the modern world economy and the radical political movements that culminated in the Islamic Revolution. Letter grade only. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East). Previously offered as HIST149  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST050A AF - African Diaspora in U.S. to 1877


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
  •  

    HIST050B AF - African Diaspora in U.S. since 1877


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Analyzing Difference
  
  •  

    HIST051 CM - Modern South Asian History through its Literature, 1700 to the Present


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST052 CM - South Asian History: An Introduction


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST053 CM - Everyday Life in South Asia


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST054 CM - Bread and Circuses: The Politics of Roman Private Life


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST055 CM - Middle East: Muhammad-Mongols


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST056 CM - Middle East: Ottomans to Present


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST059 CM - Civilizations of East Asia


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST060 PO - Asian Traditions

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): S. Yamashita
    Credit: 1

    Historical introduction to the civilizations of China, India, Korea and Japan. Examines major institutional, social and cultural developments from pre-history to 1500: the advent of sedentary agriculture, urbanization, the emergence of the first states, class relations, important religious and philosophical changes and the formation of distinctive cultural identities. (Core course, Asia)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST061 CM - The New Asia: China, Japan, India and Indonesia in the Modern Era


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST062 PO - Modern East Asia: China, Japan and Korea in 20th Century

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Chin
    Credit: 1

    History of China, Japan and Korea from the late 19th century to the late 20th century. Focuses on transnational themes, such as revolution, colonialism and modernity that have shaped the politics and identities of East Asians in recent times. (Core course, Asia)
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST068 CM - Disasters in the Ancient Mediterranean


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST070 PO - Europe and the World 1492-1800

    When Offered: Spring 2019.
    Instructor(s): G. Kates
    Credit: 1

    An introduction to early modern Europe that concentrates on Europe’s discovery, exploration, and colonization of the Indian Ocean, East Asia, and especially the Americas.  Focus is on the Portuguese, Spanish, French, Dutch, and British empires. Oral presentations and reading assignments from Raynal’s 1780 History of the Two Indies, a radical critique of colonization and slavery that became an Enlightenment classic.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive; Analyzing Difference
  
  •  

    HIST070A SC - United States History to 1865


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST070B SC - Introduction to Modern U.S. History


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST071 PO - Modern Europe Since 1789

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): P. Chu
    Credit: 1

    Modern Europe Since 1789. Introduction to the major economic, political and social developments in European society since the French Revolution, including the Industrial Revolution, Nationalism, Marxism, the Russian Revolution, political and economic imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Great Depression, the Holocaust and the development of the European Union. (Core course, Europe Since the Renaissance).
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST072 SC - History of Women in the U.S.


    See the Scripps College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST073 CM - Rise of Mod Europe 1750-Present


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST073 PZ - The Problem with Profit


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST074 PZ - Holiness, Heresy and the Body


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST080 CM - Early America: Invasion to the Civil War


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST080 PO - Revolutions, Uprisings, Coups, and Interventions in the Americas since 1910

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2016.
    Instructor(s): M. Tinker Salas; V. Silverman
    Credit: 1

    Revolutions shook the world repeatedly over the course of the twentieth century. The ways that the great powers, particularly the United States, reacted to these momentous events have been central to making the modern world. Efforts to create new societies and power structures or reimpose elite rule have been met with wildly different from reactions from the United States and are key to understanding how our world came to be. From the Mexican Revolution in 1910 to the Honduran Coup 100 years later, this course traces political, social and economic upheavals and interventions that have determined the course of history. Previously offered as HIST028  CH.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST081 CM - Modern America: 1865 to the present


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST081 HM - Science and Technology in the Early Modern World


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST082 HM - Science and Technology in the Modern World


    See the Harvey Mudd College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST084 PZ - History of Science from Islam to


    See the Pitzer College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST089A PO - California History

    When Offered: One-time only; spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): S. Reidy
    Credit: 1

    California lies at the western coast of the United States, as well as in the northern borderlands of Latin America, on the eastern edge of the Pacific world, and in the heart of indigenous homelands. As a result, California has long been a place of incredible diversity. At times, Californians have responded to this diversity with violence and exclusion, but that same diversity has enabled Californians to imagine new futures for their state and the world. This course is affiliated with Environmental Analysis, and will explore the ecological history of California, from pre-contact Native land use to modern struggles over water and wilderness. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST090 CM - Early American Capitalism


    See the Claremont Mckenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST096 CM - The Amazon


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST098 CM - The Americas: Transnational Relations


    See the Claremont McKenna College Catalog for a description of this course.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101A PO - Indian Ocean World

    When Offered: Spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    This course explores the histories of people scattered, settled, lost and found around the Indian Ocean. The course approaches the history of the Indian Ocean as a global maritime space, an economic route and cultural crossroads connecting the Middle East, Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Europe. Ranging from the spice trade and the culture of dhows, the times of the advent of Islam and the traditional Middle Eastern vessels that sailed with the monsoon winds, to the exploration and discovery of the “Indies” and the age of European imperialism and colonialism, the course examines the Indian Ocean world through the framework of transnational and global history. Readings include travel writing and works of literature. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and Middle East). Previously offered as HIST100AIPO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101ABPO - Empire and Colonialism in the Middle East and South Asia

    When Offered: Each spring.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni.
    Credit: 1

    A history of empire and imperialism in the modern Middle East, South Asia, and the Indian Ocean, examining the emergence of European colonialism in these interconnected world regions during the nineteenth century. The course explores contacts, encounters, and exchanges between cultures in an era of global transformation. (Africa/African Diaspora, South Asia, and the Middle East). Previously offered as HIST140  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101ACPO - Dark Ecologies

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): A. Khazeni
    Credit: 1

    An exploration of ecological histories in the era of the Anthropocene, the geological time period over the last 200 years when human societies have altered the Earth’s processes and been the primary cause of planetary change. Beginning with the notion that ecological life on Earth is entangled and ‘dark,’ not pristine and ‘green’ nature, the course examines the mesh that interconnects environment and society in the Anthropocene. Topics range from the impact of modern science and transformations on global environments, ecological thought and perceptions, climate change, biological exchanges, and the ruins and landscapes left in their aftermaths. Readings include works by Timothy Moreton, Anna Tsing, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Amitav Ghosh, Anne Stoler, Timothy Mitchell, and a film noir series. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101D PO - Researching the Cold War

    When Offered: Spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): P.Chu
    Credit: 1

    The Cold War, defined by the ideological conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union, was global in scope. This seminar explores its origins and development, including superpower rivalry, the forging and fracturing of socialist alliances and competition in the Third World. Students produce an original research paper based on recently declassified materials and other primary sources. Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST110D PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST101E PO - The Science of Empire

    When Offered: Fall 2021.
    Instructor(s): P. Chu
    Credit: 1

    This seminar explores the history of science in connection with the expansion of European empires. We examine how knowledge about peoples and environments helped Europeans extend control in colonial places, and how networks of commerce, travel, and exchange shaped European science. Through reading and research, we explore histories of geography, botany, and anthropology, and the evolution of such concepts as race, ethnicity, and nature. Previously offered as HIST110E PO.
    This course has been revised for fall 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST101F PO - Food and the Environment in Asia and the Pacific

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): S. Yamashita
    Credit: 1

    A single question inspired this seminar: what explains the relationship of food and the environment in Asia and the Pacific over the last century (1915-2015)? Over the course of the semester, we will examine four different answers to that question. We will ask how has the definition of specific Asian cuisines shaped their relationship to the environment? Then we will turn to the creators of cuisines—chefs—and ask how have their culinary decisions affected the environment? The third section will consider the way restaurants market themselves and ask what do their representations reveal about their relationships with the environment. And the last section will focus on the important farm-to-table movement and ask how, if at all, has it changed prevailing views of food and the environment? Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST110F PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101H PO - Research Topics in American History, 1500-1900

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): H. Wall
    Credit: 1

    Research seminar culminating in a research paper substantially based on primary sources dealing with any aspect of American history up to 1900. Letter grade only. (United States) Previously offered as HIST110H PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101HAPO - History/Biography/Autobiography

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2017.
    Instructor(s): H. Wall
    Credit: 1

    Study of American history using biographies, autobiographies and biographical fiction. Accounts of individual lives used to explore lives of “ordinary” Americans, as well as prominent social and political issues. Topics include Vietnam War; civil rights movement; political and social dissent; industrialization; ethnic, racial, religious and gender conflicts; slavery; continental expansion; and creation of the American republic. (United States) Previously offered as HIST100K PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101I PO - Cities & Travelers in Asia, 1600-2000

    When Offered: One-time only; spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): J. Herr
    Credit: 1

    This is a research seminar focused on issues in urban history in East and Southeast Asia, c. 1600-present, with a special focus on what we can learn about cities through travel accounts. Students will learn to design and execute a research project; develop research skills; reflect on methodological issues; practice analytical writing; and communicate results. Capacity in Asian languages is not prerequisite; the course will appeal primarily to students with interests in history, Asian studies, and urban studies, but all students are welcome.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101J PO - State, Citizen, Subject: Modern Japan

    When Offered: Each fall.
    Instructor(s): S. Yamashita
    Credit: 1

    An examination of the Pacific War, its impact and legacy. Topics include modern Japanese representations of themselves, the “other,” the past and official Japanese government descriptions of selected topics and popular reception of these formulations. Readings include relevant theoretical literature and selections from wartime and postwar school textbooks, personal correspondence, diaries, memoirs, fiction and oral history. (Asia) Previously offered as HIST110J PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101K PO - Politics of Honor in Ancient Greece

    When Offered: Spring 2020.
    Instructor(s): B. Keim
    Credit: 1

    This research seminar critically engages with debates about the nature and negotiation of honor in ancient Greece. Over the centuries from Achilles to Alexander diverse forms of honor served as the foundation of every identity and the currency of every relationship. Honor shaped the institutional skeleton and enlivened the ideological lifeblood that sustained the Greek body politic. As we converse with Homeric heroes and tragic heroines, famous philosophers and everyday Athenians, we will ponder together, “What is honor, and (why) does it matter?” All readings (e.g. from Homer’s Iliad, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Antigone, Herodotus’ Histories) will be in English translations. Assignments will include two in-class presentations and three writing assignments: a book review, a shorter essay on a common reading, and a significant final research paper on a topic developed by each student. Letter grade only. (Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean). Letter grade only. Previously offered as HIST110K PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST101L PO - US Labor and Working-Class History

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): V. Silverman
    Credit: 1

    Seminar examines the experiences of working people from the early 19th century to the present at work, at home and in politics. Introduces competing interpretations of trade-union ideology and politics, as well as working-class cultures and social experiences. Special emphasis on the roles of race and gender in the making of the American working class. (United States) Previously offered as HIST110L PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101M PO - Introduction to Digital Humanities: Women and Politics in Latin America

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2018.
    Instructor(s): A. Mayes
    Credit: 1

    This class uses digital methodologies to examine women’s movements and women’s political participation in Latin America and the Caribbean from the nineteenth century until the present. In this class, we will receive training in and we will use digital humanities tools such as Omeka, Voyant Tools, TimelineJS, MyHistro, among others, to curate digital exhibitions about themes, people, and events covered in the course. At the end of the class, students will produce a digital exhibition and a research paper based on their digital work. Previously offered as HIST160  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101Q PO - Writing Stories about the Bodies in East Asia

    When Offered: Each semester.
    Instructor(s): A. Chin
    Credit: 1

    Through studying cases from different parts of East Asia of how individuals’ bodies and sexualities are subject to cultural norms, state surveillance, commercialization andmedical intervention, this course engages students in critical reflections on how human bodies have been perceived and represented in modern history. We explore the themes of gender bending, sex work, plastic surgeries, disabilities, illness and death and investigate the multiple ways in which East Asian societies construct and communicate the desirable and healthy body. By looking at historical and cross-cultural examples, students will be confronted with the realities of sexual and body diversity and discrimination. We will also explore the socio-cultural mechanisms that shape our individual and collective notions of identity. The course will address issues through various forms of texts, visual images, memoirs, documentaries, letters and other writings, as well as secondary scholarly and journalistic works. The students will be required to write a 10-15 page research paper based on primary sources.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST101S CH - Latinx Oral Histories (CP)

    When Offered: Spring 2021.
    Instructor(s): T. Summers Sandoval
    Credit: 1

    Introduces students to community history in Chicanx/Latinx Studies through the theory, ethics, and practice of oral history. In partnership with local high schools, students read and discuss foundational texts; record and archive oral histories with local Latinx communities; and build a public archive for future generations. Culminates in a research paper using these sources. Letter grade only. May be repeated twice for credit. Previously offered as HIST110S CH.
    This course has been revised for spring 2021.  
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101T CH - Latinifornia

    When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.
    Instructor(s): T. Summers Sandoval
    Credit: 1

    This seminar provides a broad introduction to California history through an examination of the experiences of Latinx Americans. Beginning with the Spanish and Mexican periods and stretching to the recent past, readings connect students to research in social, political, and cultural histories exploring issues such as colonization, migration, labor, war, urbanization, and movement-making. Students use this knowledge to design and implement a research project based on archival sources and in conversation with the larger field. Letter grade only.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3
  
  •  

    HIST101U PO - Research Seminar: Political Movements in East Asia since the 1960s

    When Offered: Last offered spring 2017.
    Instructor(s): A. Chinn
    Credit: 1

    A research seminar focuses on youth political movements in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea from 1960 to the present, including the Cultural Revolution, the 1989 Tiananmen Square Movement, the Sunflower Movement, the Umbrella Movement, Zengakuren, SEALDs, the 386 generation, the June Democracy Movement, etc. The final project is a 15-20 page research essay on one of the political movements covered in the course. Previously offered as HIST110  PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Writing Intensive
  
  •  

    HIST101V PO - Gender, Sexuality and Feminisms in Modern East Asia

    When Offered: Last offered fall 2017.
    Instructor(s): A. Chin
    Credit: 1

    Research seminar focuses on primary sources that have shaped the conceptualization of gender, sexuality and feminisms in Modern China, Japan and Korea. Topics include feminist interpretations and critiques of women’s status and inequality articulated activists and theorists, gender and nationalism, “comfort women,” sex rights and queer movements. (Asia) Previously offered as HIST110V PO.
    Satisfies the following General Education Requirement(s), subject to conditions explained in the Degree Requirements section of this Catalog:
    Area 3; Speaking Intensive; Writing Intensive
 

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