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Pomona College    
 
    
 
  Jan 23, 2018
 
2017-2018 Pomona College Catalog

New and Revised Courses


Revised Courses for spring 2018


BIOL173  PO. Genomics and Bioinformatics with Laboratory. A. Cavalcanti. This course provides an introduction to the analysis of genomic datasets using computer programs and primary literature. Topics include: Models of sequence evolution, sequence alignment, similarity searching, biological databases, phylogenetic reconstruction, analysis of microarray data and next-gen sequencing data. During the first part of the course, the students will learn basic techniques of bioinformatics and data analysis, followed by student lead discussions of current literature on topics like: microbiomes, genetic regulation, genomic epidemiology, etc. Laboratory incorporates the analysis of datasets using widely available software tools. No programming experience is required. Prerequisites: BIOL040  PO. Co-requisites: BIOL041C PO or BIOL041E PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

BIOL174 PO. Data Analysis and Programming for the Life Sciences. A. Cavalcanti. This course explores the analysis of big data in the Life Sciences through hands-on classes and exercises. Although examples will mostly be biological, the techniques learned are useful for anyone interested in data analysis. Through the use of GitHub repositories and Python and R notebooks, the students will gain proficiency in the current trend of Reproducible Research techniques. Topics will include: where and how to acquire data, cleaning the data, analyzing the data and presenting results. Students will learn to use databases to organize data, and to create web applications to present results. Example datasets will include a mix of molecular and ecological data, while different statistical techniques, from basic descriptive statistics to multivariate analysis and ordination techniques, will be utilized. No previous statistics experience is required, but students should have basic programming experience. Prerequisites: BIOL040  PO and one of the following: CSCI005  HM, or CSCI030  PO, or CSCI051  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

CHEM147  PO. Inorganic Chemistry with Laboratory. N. Ball. The structure, bonding, and reactivity of inorganic molecules and solids are discussed using a symmetry and molecular orbital based approach. Additional topics including ligand field, hard/soft acid-base theories, as well as physical organometallic chemistry will be discussed with applications in spectroscopy, organometallic catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM110A PO. Co-requisite: CHEM110B PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

CSCI051G PO. Introduction to Computer Science in Grace with Laboratory. K. Bruce. Introduction to the field of computer science using the new object-oriented language Grace. Topics include iteration and recursion, basic data structures, sorting and searching, elementary analysis of algorithms and a thorough introduction to object-oriented programming. Special emphasis on graphics, animation and event-driven programming to make more interesting programs. No previous programming experience required. This section of CSCI051 PO uses a new object-oriented programming language designed to make it easier for novices to learn to program. It provides better support for more modern programming language features and provides a strong background to learn other languages. Students must take the lab associated with this section only. Course is equivalent to CSCI030  PO, CSCI051J PO, CSCI051P PO, and CSCI005  HM.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

CSCI051J PO. Introduction to Computer Science in Java with Laboratory. M. Wu. Introduction to the field of computer science using the object-oriented language Java. Topics include iteration and recursion, basic data structures, sorting and searching, elementary analysis of algorithms and a thorough introduction to object-oriented programming. Special emphasis on graphics, animation, event-driven programming and the use of concurrency to make more interesting programs. No previous programming experience required. The topics will be introduced using Java as the vehicle. Students must take the lab associated with this section only. Previously offered as CSCI051  PO. Course is equivalent to CSCI051G PO, CSCI051P PO, CSCI030  PO, CSCI051  PO, and CSCI005  HM.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

CSCI181N PO. Software Foundations: Verifying Software for Correctness. M. Greenberg. Building reliable software through formal verification. We verify that programs meet their specifications, e.g.: that sorting algorithms produce sorted permutations of their input, or that a programming language’s type system avoids errors. The course marries theory (proofs) and practice (functional programming) using a proof assistant, as used in verified compilers (CompCert) and formalized mathematics (the four-color theorem, the Feit-Thompson Odd-Order Group Theorem). Prerequisites: CSCI081  PO or CSCI131  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

EA  030  PO. Environmental Science. M. Los Huertos. This Environmental Analysis Program core course introduces the basic principles of environmental science with applications in chemistry, ecology and geology. It is part of the core course requirements for the Environmental Analysis major. The course provides a natural science foundation for Environmental Science. Topics covered include a discussion of ecosystems, climate change, energy and food production, land resources, pollution and sustainable development. A full laboratory accompanies the course and includes field and laboratory work and introduces Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping and statistics. Letter grade only. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each fall.

 

ENGL055A PO. Topics in Contemporary Literature: Impossible Novels. J. Lethem. The novel is an impossible pursuit, but some are more impossible than others. If, as in the poet Randall Jarrell’s definition, “a novel is a prose narrative of a certain length with something wrong with it,” then the novels studied in this course might be called, for their formal strategies or imaginative or verbal excesses, “prose narratives with more than a few things wrong with them.” Making uncommon demands, they raise the risk/reward quotient for their readers (and, obviously, their authors as well), and exchange the usual consolations of fiction for the possibility of plunging the reader into an unforgettable experience, even as they beg to go unread or at least unfinished. Letter grade only. May be repeated once for credit. (H5)

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

GEOL121  PO. Tectonic Landscapes. L. Reinen. Integrating field and GIS mapping, quantitative geomorphic analyses, and numerical modeling, students will gain insight into crustal deformation at local and regional scales and geomorphic expressions of tectonically derived features. Lectures, projects, field trip. Prerequisites: GEOL015  PO, or one of the courses from the GEOL020 series. Previously offered as GEOL175  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

GERM154  PO. Great Contemporary Fiction. H. Rindisbacher. Germany is the world’s most popular country (BBC), the German government is holding up the West singlehandedly (various sources) – and German literary authors are doing just fine, thank you (Frankfurter Buchmesse). The only sad thing: they rarely get translated into English – you have to read them in German. This course introduces students to some of the best contemporary German prose fiction and contextualizes it. Close reading and interpretation; some secondary literature and criticism; discussion; written and oral student contributions. Prerequisites: GERM044  PO or equivalent.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

HIST100N CH. Mexico- United States Border: Diaspora, Exiles, and Refugees (CP). A. Mayes; M. Tinker Salas. This class is a community engagement course that focuses on the U.S.-Mexico Border, paying specific attention to Haitian and other immigrant groups residing on both of sides of the border. Students will examine the historical formation of the U.S.-Mexico Border and its contemporary political economy. Students will be prepared to conduct research among and will be involved in a community engagement project focusing on immigration policy regarding Haitians and other immigrants currently residing in San Diego/Tijuana. Prerequisites: SPAN044  PO or FREN044  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2018.

 

HIST110K PO. The Politics of Honor in Ancient Greece. B. Keim. This research seminar critically engages with debates about the nature and negotiation of honor in ancient Greece. Over the centuries from Achilles to Alexander diverse forms of honor served as the foundation of every identity and the currency of every relationship. Honor shaped the institutional skeleton and enlivened the ideological lifeblood that sustained the Greek body politic. As we converse with Homeric heroes and tragic heroines, famous philosophers and everyday Athenians, we will ponder together, “What is honor, and (why) does it matter?” All readings (e.g. from Homer’s Iliad, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Antigone, Herodotus’ Histories) will be in English translations. Assignments will include two in-class presentations and three writing assignments: a book review, a shorter essay on a common reading, and a significant final research paper on a topic developed by each student. Letter grade only. (Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean). Letter grade only.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

HIST129  PO. Hollywood, War, & Empire: The Historical Film. V. Silverman. Film evolved at the same time as modern global empires and devastating wars. This course introduces students to the evolution of motion pictures which make claims to truth about these cataclysmic events, with an emphasis on US films and filmmakers. Beginning with silent films showing historic tableaus through the propaganda films of World War II to anti-war films of the 50s and 60s and the controversial political documentaries of today, students will consider both the history of film and the history presented by film. As a final project, students research and propose their own historical film dealing with the US role in the world. Previously offered as HIST122  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2018.

 

HIST146  AF. Interconnections Between Africa and the Americas During the Era of the Slave Trade. O. Traore. The course explores how Africans and their descendants created radically new social, political, spiritual, demographic, and physical environments throughout the Americas and, in so doing, fundamentally affected the development of the Atlantic World. It also examines the scholarly literature on the role of Africa and Africans in the making of the Atlantic World. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

HIST160  PO. Introduction to Digital Humanities: Women and Politics in Latin America. A. Mayes. This class uses digital methodologies to examine women’s movements and women’s political participation in Latin America and the Caribbean from the nineteenth century until the present. In this class, we will receive training in and we will use digital humanities tools such as Omeka, Voyant Tools, TimelineJS, MyHistro, among others, to curate digital exhibitions about themes, people, and events covered in the course. At the end of the class, students will produce a digital exhibition and a research paper based on their digital work.

Credit: 1

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2018.

 

PE  091  PO. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. K. Jones. Theory and practice in the care and prevention of injuries commonly encountered in athletics and physical education. Lecture, lab and demonstration. Does not satisfy the physical education requirement. Prerequisites: Any PE course from PE  101  PO – PE  185  PO.

Credit: 0.5

When offered: As announced in semester schedule of classes.

 

PHYS128  PO. Electronics with Laboratory (CP). J. Hudgings. Electronics with Laboratory. Transistors and integrated circuits in a variety of applications, including operational amplifiers, basic digital circuits, analog/digital conversion and an introduction to microprocessors. Course contains a community partnership component.  Project required. Prerequisites: PHYS041  PO and PHYS042  PO, or PHYS070  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.

 

PSYC180B PO. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. S. Masland. Focuses on current issues and controversies in the field of clinical psychology, incorporating evaluation of the role of the mental-health professional. Analysis of theories of psychotherapy (particularly cognitive and behavioral) and treatment of specific mental-health disorders. Emphasizes critical thinking, discussion and writing about research, theory, and case studies. Letter grade only. Prerequisite: PSYC131  PO.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

RUSS182  PO. Post-Soviet Russian Culture and Society. L. Rudova. The course explores the major changes in Russian society since the collapse of the U.S.S.R. through fiction, popular media and film. Topics include post-Soviet identity and nostalgia, nationalism, wars in Chechnya, terrorism, control of the media, ecological issues, new religiosity and popular culture. Readings from the Russian media and contemporary fiction. Films. Prerequisites: RUSS044  PO. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit: 1

When offered: Spring 2018.

 

SOC 116  PO. American Families. J. Grigsby. As the most basic social institution, the family is important not only to individual members, but also to other social institutions and society as a whole.  Understanding human behavior in the context of the family, therefore, includes the individual, group, institutional, and societal levels of analysis. First we will see how the family as a social institution has changed over time in the United States and in particular, how immigration affects families. Social processes that take place in the context of the family (as a social institution), such as dating, forming intimate partnerships, parenting, and providing care comprise another aspect of this course. We will also look at social situations that challenge families and family members, such as work - both inside and outside the home, poverty, and domestic violence. While most of the course readings emphasize theory and empirical research, we will also examine public debate about family structure and processes that have appeared recently in the popular media. Throughout the semester we will address the roles of race, gender, age, social class, and sexual orientation in the family as a social institution.

Credit: 1

When offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2018.

 

THEA130  PO. Introduction to Directing (CP). G. Ortega. This is an introduction to the art and craft of directing for the stage and related forms that will allow the artist to enhance their vision and eventually formulate their concept into fruition. There will be an emphasis on play selection, detailed script analysis, the director’s concept, collaboration with designers, auditions and casting, actor coaching, rehearsal strategies, and production methods. We will workshop several scenes as well as projects that the students will create. In addition, our directors will have the opportunity to work with students from a local elementary school as a community partner to produce a short adaptation of a fairy tale or a fable being taught in their curriculum. Community Partnership course. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: THEA001 PO and THEA 002 PO, or permission from instructor. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit: 1

When offered: Each spring.